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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2018 with funding from 

Columbia University-Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing Alumni Association, Inc. 


https://archive.org/details/announcement1999pres 


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Columbia 

University 

Bulletin 


School of Nursing 
1999-2002 

cto 





2 


Contents 


4 MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN 

16 FINANCIAL AID 

6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Financial Aid Administered by the School of Nursing, 17 
Alumni Association Awards, 17 

Grants and Scholarships Administered by New York State, 17 
Loans, 18 

7 THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Philosophy, 7 

Organization of the Curricula, 8 

Accreditation, 8 

Programs of Study, 8 

Instructional Resources, 9 

Classrooms, Conference Rooms, Laboratories, 9 

Libraries and Computer Facilities, 10 

Clinical and Research Facilities, 11 

Academic Research Centers at the 

Columbia University School of Nursing, 11 

The Morningside Campus, 12 

20 ADMISSION 

Admission Procedures, 20 

Programs of Study, 20 

Admission to the Master’s Program for Non-Nurse 

College Graduates, 20 

Admission to the Master’s Program for RN’s 
(Diploma & Associate Degree Graduates), 21 

Admission to the Master’s Program for RN’s with a 

BS Degree, 22 

Admission to the Master’s Degree Program 
for RN’s with Non-Nursing Baccalaureate Degrees, 22 
Admission to the Advanced Certificate Program, 22 

13 STUDENT SERVICES 

Office of Student Services, 13 

Student Life, 13 

The Student Association, 13 

Sigma Theta Tau, 13 

Extra Mural Activities, 13 

International Students, 13 

Housing, 14 

Disability-Related Services, 14 

Student Health Services, 14 

Athletic Facilities, 14 

Student Services, 14 

Parking, 14 

Bookstore, 14 

Orientation, 15 

Tutoring, 15 

Counseling, 15 

Advisement 15 

Student Records, 16 

Transportation, 16 

Admission to the Doctoral Program, 23 

Admission of International Students, 23 

Admisstion as a Non-Degree Student, 23 

Admisstion Testing Information, 24 

Advanced Standing and Exemption, 24 

Registration, 25 

27 ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Program Plans, 27 

Course Changes, 27 

Academic Standing, 27 

Evaluation and Grading, 28 

Dean’s List 29 

Attendance and Leave of Absence, 29 

Withrawal, 29 

Suspension, 30 

Dismissal, 30 

Appeal of Dismissal, 30 

Readmission, 30 

Graduation, 31 

Professional Integrity, 31 

Student Rights and Responsibilities, 31 

Guidelines on Alcohol, 31 

Guidelines on Smoking, 31 

Guidelines on Substance Abuse, 31 



3 


32 OFFICIAL REGULATIONS 

Reservation of University Rights, 32 

Registration Status, 32 

Attendance and Length of Residence, 32 

Religious Holidays, 32 

Academic Discipline, 33 

Rules of University Conduct, 33 

Policy Statement on Discrimination and Harassment, 33 

Statement of Nondiscriminatory Policies, 34 

Discrimination Grievance Procedure, 36 

Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 31 

Columbia University Ombuds Office, 38 

39 PROTECTION AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT 

Policy Statement on Sexual Harassment, 39 
Charge of the University Panel on Sexual Harrassment, 40 
Sexual Harrassment Complaint Procedures, 40 
Sexual Misconduct Policy and Alternative Procedure, 40 
Policy, 40 

Alternative Procedure, 41 
Hearing Panelists, 41 
Gatekeepers, 41 

Romantic Relationship Advisory Statement, 41 

42 ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Programs of Study, 42 

The Entry-To-Practice (ETP) Program, 42 
The Accelerated Master’s Program for Nurses (AMP), 43 
The Master’s Program, 44 
Advanced Practice Programs, 46 
Acute Nurse Practitioner, 46 
Nurse Anesthesia, 46 
Nurse Midwifery, 46 

Psychiatric/Mental Health Practitioner, 47 
Adult Nurse Practitioner, 47 
Family Nurse Practitioner, 47 
Geriatric Nurse Practitioner, 48 
Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, 48 
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, 48 
Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, 49 
The Advanced Certificate Program, 49 
Subspecialty Programs, 49 

HIV/AIDS Subspecialty Program, 49 
Genetic Counseling, 49 
Alcohol and Substance Abuse, 49 
Emergency Nursing, 49 
Nephrology Nursing, 49 
Acute/Critical Care for PNPs, 49 
Behavioral Pediatrics, 50 
Clinical Research Coordination, 50 
Gero Psychiatry, 50 


Doctor of Nursing Science (DNSc) Degree Program, 50 
Joint-Degree Programs, 50 

Nursing and Public Health (M.S./M.P.H.), 50 
Nursing and Business (M.S./M.B.A.), 51 

52 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Key to Course Listings, 52 
Course Credit, 52 
Course Descriptions, 52 

75 ADMINISTRATION AND 
INSTRUCTIONAL AFFAIRS 

University Administration, 75 
Officers of Instruction, 75 
Full-Time Clinical Faculty, 78 
Part-Time Faculty, 78 
Office of Student Affairs, 78 
Administrative Staff, 78 

79 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

Major Religious Holidays, 79 

FINDING YOUR WAY 

Maps 

Health Sciences Campus, 88 
Morningside Campus, 89 
Morningside Heights, 90 



To Communicate with the School 

ADDRESS INQUIRIES TO: 

School of Nursing 
630 West 168th Street 
New York, NY 10032 

TELEPHONE: 

(212) 305-5756 

Photo credits: Gary Goldenber, pg. 6; Lynn Saville, pg. 15, 22, 25; 
Deborah Rudolph, pg. 33 , 44. 



4 


Message from the Dean 


This academic bulletin offers an overview of 
curriculum, faculty, and student activities in the School 
of Nursing. As the School celebrates the beginning of 
its second century, it also celebrates its renewal and 
redefinition as a premier educational resource for 
aspiring nurse leaders. As with other health 
professions schools at Columbia, enrollment is limited 
to those who have already earned a baccalaureate 
degree, either in nursing for entrance to Advanced 
Practice education, or in another field for 
matriculation in the first professional degree. 

Registered nurses without a degree can be admitted to 
an honors program leading to the M.S. degree. The 
curriculum is accelerated and targeted at superior 
academic performers with firm career goals in the 
nursing profession. The Advanced Practice program 
offers the M.S. degree in many clinical specialties, all 
providing eligibility for certification as a nurse 
practitioner, as well as dual certification for some as 
clinical nurse specialists. The Doctor of Nursing 
Science degree program provides training in clinical 
research and health policy and requires an M.S. degree 
in nursing for admission. The faculty represent the 
very best in clinical competence and scholarly 
achievement. 

Why Nursing? 

Nursing is in a well-earned position of ascendancy 
and recognition. Having proven clinical competency in 
the full scope of primary care and in the care of 
acutely ill patients, Advanced Practice nurses have 
gained broad legislative practice authority in every 
state. Always a valued career, nursing is now in a 
position to reaffirm its clinical value while advancing to 
containing costs and increasing access. Especially for 
those underserved and uninsured, nursing has a 
central role to play in health care reform. Providing 
primary care, community-based services, disease 
prevention, and health promotion, practicing in 
underserved inner city and rural areas, and assuring 


patient understanding of therapy are all prominent and 
valuable activities at which nurses excel. As society 
recognizes the importance of high-level professional 
nursing practice, talented and forward-thinking 
individuals are increasingly attracted to the profession. 
Coinciding with society’s expanded view of nursing is 
the development of scholarly nursing endeavors, as 
demonstrated by the increase in funding for nursing 
research over the past few years. 

Education in nursing provides an individual with 
opportunities for a challenging career with high-level 
authority and accountibility and deeply gratifying 
personal rewards. Master’s and doctoral degrees 
prepare nurses for leadership positions as clinical 
specialists, administrators, policy experts, and 
researchers, all of which are in high demand in today’s 
health care environment. 










MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN 5 


Why Columbia? 

The Columbia University School of Nursing is part 
of one of the world’s most renowned medical centers. 
We are a close-knit and interactive group of four 
schools and three smaller independent programs: the 
Schools of Medicine, Dental and Oral Surgery, Public 
Health, and Nursing; and Programs in Occupational 
Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Human Nutrition. We 
are a neighborhood collaborating on research and 
clinical experiences, and sharing a vision for the future 
of health care in this country. The School of Nursing is 
proud of its 100+ year history of educating nursing 
leaders. It is internationally known and clinically 
unrivaled, with recognition for excellence in other 
scholarly endeavors as well. Recent contributions to 
the profession include the first universal faculty 
practice plan in a school of nursing, the first Endowed 
Nursing Chair in Health Policy and the first with 
Collaborative Center for International Nursing 
Development in Advanced Practice. 


Why Now? 

Never has a career in nursing been so inviting. 
Advanced Practice Nurses are in short supply. Nursing 
leadership is critically needed. The practice of 
professional nursing is one of life’s noblest careers, and 
the advancement of nursing academic and clinical 
excellence is the mission of this School. We invite you 
to be a participant in that mission. 


Mary O. Mundinger 
Dean of the School of Nursing 





6 


Columbia University 


By royal charter of King George II of England, 
Columbia University was founded in 1754 as King’s 
College. It is the oldest institution of higher learning in 
New York State and the fifth oldest in the nation. 

Columbia University has, since its inception, 
addressed the issues of the moment, making important 
contributions to American life through the teaching 
and research conducted within its schools and 
departments. Columbia University now comprises 16 
schools and departments and is affiliated with major 
research-oriented medical centers, most notably 
Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 


Located on the Upper West Side of New York City, 
the University is associated with 71 research and public 
service institutes and 22 scholarly journals. The library 
system contains more than 30 million manuscripts, 
microfilm tapes, and printed volumes. Faculty members 
currently number 1,800. Since 1906, 41 Columbia 
University alumni and faculty have received the Nobel 
Prize in various fields-a testament to the academic 
preeminence of the University. Candidates from the top 
of their high school classes and from the best 
undergraduate institutions in America compete for 
places in the University’s schools. 
























7 


The School of Nursing 


Located on the Health Sciences campus, the 
Columbia University School of Nursing was founded in 
1892 with Anna C. Maxwell as its first director. Since 
its inception, the mission of the School has been the 
preparation of clinically excellent nurse practitioners, 
clinical nurse specialists, and scholars. The School of 
Nursing was the first in the country to award a 
master’s degree in a clinical nursing specialty (1956). 
More than 7,000 nurses have graduated since the 
School was opened. 

The emphasis on clinical scholarship at Columbia 
University is particularly appropriate because of the 
interdisciplinary collaboration of the School of Nursing 
with the other professional schools in its environs. The 
School of Nursing shares the Health Sciences campus 
with the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health, 
the School of Dental and Oral Surgery, and the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, which includes 
programs in Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, 
and Nutrition. Each of these schools adds to the 
richness and diversity of the educational experience of 
students and of the School of Nursing. 

School of Nursing faculty have substantial 
experience in teaching and instructional design, 
practice and research, and maintain expertise in their 
areas of teaching responsibility through participation at 
local, regional, and national conferences, involvement 
in scholarly presentations and publications, and faculty 
practice. Faculty involvement in scholarly and 
professional activities is substantial. A positive and 
supportive environment for these pursuits is 
maintained. 

The graduates of the School of Nursing are one of 
its major strengths. Graduates are recruited for 
leadership positions in practice, education, and 
management. 

Curricula are evaluated on a continual basis to 
ensure that graduates meet the needs of a dynamic 
society and advance the profession while maintaining 


high academic standards. The School of Nursing 
reserves the right to make changes in the program of 
studies and courses of instruction at any time. 

Philosophy 

The faculty, representing all clinical nursing 
disciplines, believe that in a dynamic society, education 
for membership in a profession includes development 
not only of expertise in a field but also of social 
awareness. 

The professional nurse thinks critically, exercises 
technical competence, and makes socially significant 
contributions to society through theory-based practice. 
Nursing’s role and responsibility to society are to 
establish and maintain relationships with clients that 
support and restore health and well-being. The 
professional nurse has the ability to diagnose and treat 
human responses to actual or potential health 
problems and to provide preventive health services to 
individuals and groups in a variety of settings. 

Belief in the integrity and worth of all human 
beings is basic. Each person is viewed as an individual 
with unique characteristics and behaviors, evolving 
through time, in constant interaction with a complex 
environment. People throughout the life cycle have 
specific biophysical, psychosocial, cognitive, and 
spiritual needs that they strive to keep in harmony. 

People as rational, sentient beings have the right to 
self-determination and participation in decision making 
in health and illness. The professional nurse has a 
responsibility to provide health education to assist 
individuals in effective participation in their care and 
treatment. Access to health care is the right of all. 
Nurses engage in political and societal activities 
supportive of this belief and serve as client advocates 
in the health care system. 



8 THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 


The professional nurse is viewed both as a 
responsible health care provider accountable for the 
quality of practice and as an agent of change in the 
health care delivery system. Nursing seeks to advance 
its contribution through research and collaboration 
with other health professions. Well-developed 
leadership abilities are inherent in professional nursing 
practice. The nurse acts independently and 
interdependently. 

The faculty endeavor to provide knowledge; to 
stimulate learning; to define issues; to serve as 
resource persons, administrators, leaders, and 
innovators in nursing through education, research, and 
practice; and to contribute to the development of 
human values. The faculty recognize that interests and 
abilities vary, and they seek to provide flexibility in the 
curriculum to facilitate the optimal development of 
each learner’s potential. Learning is viewed as a 
lifelong process, and learners are expected to be self- 
directed and accountable for their performance. 

The Entry-To-Practice program develops the 
competence required for general professional nursing 
practice and provides a firm base for graduate study. 
The Graduate program advances nursing competence 
by extending and deepening knowledge within a 
specific clinical specialty. The Doctor of Nursing 
Science Program prepares nurse scholars to examine, 
shape, and direct nursing practice within our evolving 
system of health care delivery. The Continuing 
Education program addresses the emerging needs of 
practicing nurses in maintaining their clinical expertise. 
All programs emphasize the development of clinical 
expertise, a hallmark of the Columbia University 
School of Nursing. 

Organization of the Curricula 

The organizing framework, encompassing the 
concepts of person, environment, health, and nursing, 
is derived from the philosophy of the School of 
Nursing. The concept of person recognizes the 
individual as a growing, human organism best 
understood in the context of the individual’s own life 
process, beliefs, and culture. Person is understood to 


include individuals, families, groups, and communities. 
The concept of environment allows for study of the 
person in relation to the individual’s immediate and 
global surroundings. The surroundings may include 
neighborhoods, hospitals, or the health care system in 
general. Health is studied on a health-illness continuum, 
acknowledging that each person has specific 
biophysical and psychosocial needs. Nursing is a 
profession whose members have the responsibility to 
enhance health care through scientific inquiry, through 
collaboration with other health professionals, and 
through client advocacy in the health care system. The 
School of Nursing programs use a multitheoretical 
approach to execute these concepts. Examples of 
theories used include nursing theories, stress/ 
adaptation theory, physiological theories, 
and systems theory. 

Accreditation 

All programs are accredited by the National League 
for Nursing and the New York State Education 
Department through 2004. The Nurse Midwifery 
program is accredited by the American College of Nurse 
Midwives; the Nurse Anesthesia program is accredited by 
the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia 
Educational Programs. The School is certified as an 
American Nurses Association provider for continuing 
education. It is a member of the Council of Baccalaureate 
and Higher Degree Programs of the National League for 
Nursing and the American Association of Colleges of 
Nursing. 

Programs of Study 

Underlying the programs offered by the School of 
Nursing is the view that nursing is a practicing art, one 
that is dedicated to the health of people. It is an 
applied science based on biological, physical, and 
behavioral disciplines. By acquiring knowledge of the 
art and science of nursing and learning to put this 
knowledge into practice, the nurse fulfills the goals of 
providing comfort with compassion, promoting 
optimal levels of health, and acting effectively during 
periods of illness. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 9 


The Entry-To-Practice (ETP) program enrolls non- 
RN baccalaureate holders who wish to study nursing 
in an accelerated program that combines basic nursing 
education and clinical specialization at the master’s 
level. 

The Accelerated Master’s Program (AMP) is a program 
designed to meet the educational and career mobility 
needs of registered nurses who already hold an associate’s 
degree in nursing. AMP enables outstanding RNs to earn a 
B.S. followed by an M.S. degree in a clinical specialty by 
pursuing a streamlined plan of study. For qualified RNs, 
AMP offers admission to a graduate specialty. 

The /Vlaster’s program, leading to the M.S. degree, 
affords baccalaureate-prepared nurses the opportunity 
to increase their knowledge in Advanced Nursing 
Practice. All programs are registered with the New 
York State Education Department as Nurse 
Practitioner programs, enabling graduates to be 
certified for advanced practice and prescriptive 
privileges. Specialization is possible in adult, family, 
geriatric, pediatric, or women’s health primary care; 
acute care; neonatal care; nurse midwifery; nurse 
anesthesia; and psychiatric mental health. Sub¬ 
specializations are available in HIV/AIDS nursing, 
alcohol and substance abuse, genetics for advanced 
practice nursing, behavioral pediatrics, emergency 
nursing, nephrology nursing, oncology, and gero- 
psychiatric nursing. 

The Advanced Certificate program allows registered 
nurses who hold a master’s degree in nursing to 
pursue an Advanced Practice program as nurse 
practitioner in a clinical area without earning another 
master’s degree. 

The Doctor of Nursing Science (DNSc) degree 
program is designed to prepare master’s degree¬ 
holding clinical nurse scholars to examine, shape, and 
direct the practice of nursing within our evolving 
system of health care delivery. 

The Continuing Education program addresses the 
educational needs of practicing nurses. Programs are 
offered that develop or expand clinical expertise or 
prepare nurses for certification examinations. 


Columbia’s Nurse Anesthesia program is unique as 
the first master’s degree nurse anesthesia program in 
New York State and one of the first master’s degree 
programs in the United States. The Nurse Midwifery 
program is the oldest master’s program in the United 
States. 

INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES 

Classrooms, Conference Rooms, Laboratories 
(skills learning) 

All classrooms on the Health Sciences campus are 
available to all health sciences students. Four floors in 
the Hammer Health Sciences Center house the 
teaching facilities. These floors include classrooms, 
conference and seminar rooms, and two auditoriums 
that contain state-of-the-art audiovisual equipment. In 
addition, the Learning Center at Columbia- Old 
Presbyterian (17th Floor) houses labs and computer 
resources. Conference rooms and amphitheatres as 
well as the 700-seat Alumni Auditorium in the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons Building are used 
extensively. The School of Nursing building houses a 
Technology Learning Center (TLC). The TLC includes a 
mock hospital unit containing several patient units and 
an ambulatory care area for practicing primary care 
skills; it is used by graduate and undergraduate 
students for skills development, including physical 
assessment and state-of-the-art monitoring technology. 



10 INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES 


Libraries and Computer Facilities 

The Augustus C. Long Library occupies four floors 
of the Hammer Health Sciences Center. This library is 
a part of the Columbia University library system, 
which encompasses approximately forty libraries 
related to major areas of academic inquiry. These 
libraries contain more than four million volumes. The 
Long Library houses health-related publications and 
books. Other libraries used extensively by the faculty 
and students at the Columbia University School of 
Nursing (CUSN) include the Butler Library on the 
Morningside campus, the Wollman Library at Barnard, 
and the Teachers College Library. In addition, the 
Library of the Psychiatric Institute, which contains 
material on mental health and psychiatry, is open to 
faculty and students. 

The services provided by the Long Library are 
extensive, by virtue of its association with the Schools 
of Nursing, Medicine, Public Health, and Dental and 
Oral Surgery, and with the Programs in Physical 
Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Nutrition. 
Columbia Libraries Information Online (CLIO), the 
online catalog, provides students and faculty with the 
location, call number, and library location of all current 
serials and most books cataloged since 1981 at 
Columbia University. This information may be obtained 
by author, subject, or title. CD-ROM and MED LARS 
for nursing literature is rapid, up-to-date, and state-of- 
the-art. The Microcomputer Center provides a variety 
of services, including word processing, statistical 
analysis, and CAI. The Center for Computing Activities 
has developed workshops to teach students and faculty 
the fine points of microcomputer usage. The center 
has approximately thirty IBM PCs, ATs, and Macintosh 
computers. 

The Long Library contains more than 350,000 
volumes of books and journals, some 5,000 
pamphlets, and about 2,000 slides on the history of 
medicine and health care. More than 4,000 national 
and international journals are received. An entire floor 
of the library is devoted to facilities for self instruction 
through audiovisual material. Other aids include 
microfilming, inter-library loans, study and conference 
facilities, and photocopying services. 


An extensive Florence Nightingale Collection is 
maintained in the Long Library. This collection makes 
up a part of the rare books holdings of the Library and 
is featured at exhibitions along with rare holdings of 
Freud and Webster. It is available to students, faculty, 
and visiting nursing historians for research purposes. 
Columbia students are also permitted access to the 
collections of Harvard and Yale Universities under the 
auspices of the Research Libraries Group. Information 
about the Research Libraries Group can be obtained 
from the Long Library. Student memberships, which 
include borrowing privileges, are available for an 
annual fee in the New York Academy of Medicine 
Library at 103rd Street and Fifth Avenue. Applications 
for membership should be directed to the 
Academy Library. 














INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES 11 


Clinical and Research Facilities 

The major center of clinical activity for the Health 
Sciences is the New York Presbyterian Hospital’s 
(NYPH) Columbia campus. NYPH is recognized as 
one of the finest academic medical centers in the 
world. Patient care, research, and teaching are integral 
to its service to society. Charged with the energy of 
new ideas, it provides an unparalleled clinical 
environment for nursing students. Among the most 
notable sites are: 

The Milstein Hospital Building: a 745-bed facility 
providing state-of-the-art patient care. A network of 
enclosed bridges and tunnels links the hospital with 
University classrooms and laboratories. Computer 
terminals are part of every patient care unit, giving 
nurses the opportunity to concentrate on patient 
care—their specialty. 

The Allen Pavilion, a 100-bed community hospital 
and primary care center designed to meet the specific 
health care needs of the northern Manhattan 
community. The Allen Pavilion is committed to primary 
care specialties. 

The Center for Women and Children, which includes 
Babies Hospital and the Sloane Hospital for Women. Most 
notable among their many achievements are the 
development of the Apgar test for assessing infant 
health at birth, the first amniocentesis, and the 
identification and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. 

The Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, one of 
eleven federally funded centers designated as a 
regional academic resource by the U.S. Department of 
Aging. This Center brings together specialists in 
geriatrics, including faculty from the fields of nursing, 
medicine, dentistry, public health, occupational 
therapy, psychiatry, and social work. 

Organ Transplant Center. Organ transplantation is a 
complex enterprise. The transplant team, including 
nurse clinicians, works closely with families to help 
them cope with the stress of the transplant 
experience. This integrative effort is a cornerstone of 
Columbia’s approach to patient care. 

The NYPH-Cornell Campus and the Mt. Sinai 
Medical Center are other centers of clinical activity. 


In addition, some 150 clinical placement sites are 
available in the tri-state area. A brief list of the School 
of Nursing’s major affiliations includes Lawrence 
Hospital in Bronxville, New York City Medical Centers 
at Harlem, Lenox Hill Hospital, and St. Lukes/ 
Roosevelt Medical Center. 

Various community based agencies provide 
opportunities for students to learn to care for their 
populations. These include Visiting Nurse Service, 
Morris Heights Childbearing Center, and Planned 
Parenthood. 

Academic Research Centers at the Columbia 
University School of Nursing 

THE CENTER FOR AIDS RESEARCH 

Director: Joyce K. Anastasi, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N. 

The Center for AIDS Research provides a 
comprehensive framework for training, educational 
programs and research which addresses health 
promotion, disease prevention, symptom management 
and quality of life for individuals with HIV. 

The goal of the Center is to create innovative 
research and service approaches for the prevention 
and management of HIV. This objective is fulfilled 
through research, program development and program 
evaluations. Education is the philosophical thread that 
weaves through all Center activities: health promotion 
and education for clients; clinical and academic training 
of professionals. Professional training is accomplished 
through university-based academic programs and 
clinical affiliation. Faculty interact with graduate 
professional students, community systems and 
individual clients and families. 



12 INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES 


THE CENTER FOR HEALTH POLICY 

Director: Kristine M. Gebbie, Dr.PH, R.N., F.A.A.N. 

The Center for Health Policy and Health Services 
Research addresses urgent health-care delivery needs, 
especially those of the nation’s inner-city populations. 
The Center has worked to develop models for 
education of nurses and models of care delivery that 
will increase access to high-quality, cost-effective 
primary care prevention services for inner-city 
residents. Center personnel are currently working to 
identify education needs of public health nurses in the 
changing health system and studying paradigms of 
public health in use by State Health agencies. 

The Center also convenes policy makers and 
interested professionals to explore current issues. The 
Health Policy Round Table, an informal exploration of 
current health policy topics, meets every other week. 

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION 
COLLABORATING CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL 
NURSING DEVELOPMENT IN ADVANCED 
PRACTICE 

Director: Richard Garfield, Dr.PH, R.N. 

The purposes of this center include: sharing of 
relevant curricula, teaching methods and clinical site 
development for advanced nursing practice nationally 
and internationally, including the exchange of nursing 
scholars in education, practice and research; 
collaboration with specific countries and other 
collaborating centers in the promotion and network 
development for advanced practice in the multi-site 
delivery of health care, including the capacity for 
health policy strategy and health services research; and 
collaboration with WHO and PAHO in disseminating 
models of interdisciplinary education, practice and 
research in nursing, especially as they pertain to 
advanced nursing practitioners in primary care 
collaboration with physicians. 


INSTITUTES AND CENTERS 

Columbia University is privileged to sponsor a 
number of institutes and centers that engage in 
funded, interdisciplinary research and program 
development, sponsor workshops and courses, and act 
as a clearinghouse for information related to their 
specific focus. Of particular interest are the following 
institutes and centers: 

American Law Institute 
Center for the Study of Alzheimer’s Disease 
Center for the Behavioral and Clinical Study 
of HIV/AIDS 

Center for Children in Poverty 

Center for Law and Economics 

Center for Population Studies 

Center for Neurobiology and Behavior 

Center for Research in Career Development 

Center for the Study of Society and Medicine 

Center for Human Rights 

Comprehensive Cancer Center 

Institute for Human Nutrition 

Institute for Study on Women and Gender 

Legislative Drafting Research Fund 

The Morningside Campus 

The Morningside campus, centered at 116th Street 
and Broadway, occupies several acres of urban 
property. Located here are the principal educational 
resources of the University, in the midst of the cultural 
resources of New York City. (See the map of the 
Morningside campus.) 

Located on the Morningside campus are Columbia 
College; the Schools of General Studies, Law, Engineering 
and Applied Science, Journalism, International and Public 
Affairs, the Arts, Business, Social Work, and Architecture, 
Planning, and Preservation; and the Graduate School of 
Arts and Sciences. Barnard College, Teachers College, 
and Union Theological Seminary are also on the 
Morningside campus. 



13 


Student Services 


OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES 

The Office of Student Services (OSS), located in 
the School of Nursing, functions in man/ capacities 
during a student’s education with emphasis on 
students’ rights and responsibilities. OSS staff are 
available to assist students in the resolution of specific 
problems or for referral to other University offices. 
The Assistant Dean for Student Services serves as the 
Student Advocate. 

The Office of Student Services also functions as a 
Inquiry Center for prospective applicants, an 
Admissions Office, as well as an Academic and 
Counseling Center for students engaged in academic 
pursuits. 

STUDENT LIFE 

Students entering the Columbia University School 
of Nursing come from diverse educational and 
experiential backgrounds. While some master’s 
degree candidates enter directly from college, others 
are making mid-life career changes, and some are 
returning to college after raising a family. Advanced 
Practice degree candidates are qualified nurses 
pursuing an M.S. in a clinical specialty after one or 
more years of clinical experience, while others are 
leaders in nursing, pursuing doctoral studies. The 
common factor shared by all students is the goal of a 
graduate degree. 

Sigma Theta Tau 

The Alpha Zeta Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the 
International Nursing Honor Society, was established 
at the School of Nursing in 1964. Membership is by 
invitation, and the selection of graduate and 
undergraduate students is based on excellence in 
academic performance and evidence of leadership 
potential. The Chapter sponsors a research 
conference as well as several program meetings 
annually. 


Extramural Activities 

There are opportunities for students who wish to 
become involved in community affairs. Such students 
may participate in the local community planning board 
or at health fairs, screening clinics, rape intervention 
crisis centers, or senior citizen centers. Most of these 
opportunities are well represented by students in all 
four health professions schools. 

International Students 

The staff of the International Student and Scholars 
Office, 525 Riverside Drive, provide advice and 
counseling to foreign students on such matters as 
housing, personal and financial problems, and 
regulations of the United States Immigration and 
Naturalization Service (visas, extensions of stay, work 
permission, temporary departure from the United 
States, transfer from Columbia to another school, 
termination of study). Information about the various 
international student clubs at Columbia and about 
opportunities to attend conferences, travel in the 
United States, and participate in community and 
cultural activities may be obtained from this office. 
Maps of New York City and discount tickets to plays 
are available. 

The staff also provide information and counseling 
on University admission, advanced standing, English 
proficiency examinations, and academic placement. 
The staff evaluate all foreign transcripts for equivalency 
to American education. 




14 STUDENT SERVICES 


Housing 

Over 1,000 students reside on the Health Sciences 
campus in university accommodations. Both single 
student and couples housing is available. The goal of 
the Health Sciences Housing Office is to provide on- 
campus housing for as many incoming students as 
possible. Although on-campus housing is not 
guaranteed, every effort is made to provide on-campus 
housing to students who are coming to the university 
and live outside the metropolitan area. General 
information and housing information/application 
request cards are distributed by your school at the 
time of acceptance. General housing information is 
available at: http://cpmcnet.columbia.edu/dept/ 
hshousing/general.html or you may contact the office at 
(212)304-7000. 

Disability-Related Services 

Students with permanent or temporary disabilities 
who wish to request special arrangements are urged to 
notify the Assistant Dean for Student Services for 
disability-related services as early as possible: 212-305- 
5756. To allow adequate time for making such 
arrangements, please give at least eight weeks’ notice 
before the start of the term involved. For taped texts 
or special housing arrangements, V/ 2 months’ notice is 
needed. General questions about services, resources, 
wheelchair access, or student networking may be 
directed to the Coordinator of Disability Services, 305 
Low Memorial Library, 212-854-6794. 

Student Health Service 

The Student Health Service is a primary care 
facility that offers students and their families 
comprehensive medical care and a broad array of 
specialist services directed toward prevention as well as 
treatment of health problems. The Student Health 
Service facility is located on the street level of Bard 
Haven Tower 1 (60 Haven Avenue). 

Detailed information about Student Health Service 
may be found in FACETS, the Columbia University 
Handbook for students. 


Athletic Facilities 
BARD ATHLETIC CLUB 

The renovated Bard Athletic Club encompasses a 
twenty-yard swimming pool, three squash courts, a 
gymnasium, an exercise room. Nautilus and Universal 
exercise equipment, stationary bicycles and rowing 
machines, lockers, showers, and saunas. The facility is 
wheelchair-accessible. 

Membership in the Bard Athletic Club is open to 
all Columbia University Health Sciences students, their 
spouses, employees, and alumni. Membership 
information and fees are available at the Bard Athletic 
Club, or by calling 212-854-2546. 

The term of membership for students and spouses 
runs from August through July. The membership term 
for non-students (including Health Sciences Fellows) 
begins in September. 

STUDENT SERVICES 

Parking 

The privilege of parking in University-operated lots 
is offered first to all full-time matriculated students 
who must drive to school and to any students with 
disabilities. Parking privileges may be granted to 
others as space permits. Applications for parking and 
information regarding fees can be obtained in the 
Office of the Dean. The Student Handbook contains a 
listing of non-University parking areas. 

Bookstore 

The Medical Center Bookstore, operated by 
Barnes and Noble, is located in the Audubon Building 
at West 165th Street and Broadway. It offers a wide 
variety of supplies and services. 



STUDENT SERVICES 15 


Orientation 

Orientation programs for all new students are held 
every semester. New students are strongly 
encouraged to attend. Information regarding the day, 
time, and place of orientation can be obtained from 
the Office of Student Services. 

Tutoring 

For students having academic difficulty, the 
University’s Learning Center on the Morningside 
campus is the main referral source. Tutors are 
available in writing, basic math and science, and other 
subjects. These services are provided free to 
Columbia students. 

Students in need of tutoring in an area not offered 
by the Learning Center, e.g., Anatomy and Physiology, 
can make tutoring arrangements through the Office of 
Student Services. There is a fee for these services, 
determined by the student and tutor. 



Counseling 

The Student Health Service provides a 
comprehensive mental health care program. Short¬ 
term counseling for any problem is provided by a 
professional staff of psychiatrists/psychologists. 
Appointments are scheduled immediately. 
Confidentiality is maintained. For those students not 
enrolled in the Health Services plan, the Assistant 
Dean for Student Services can suggest referral sources. 

Advisement 

Upon enrollment, each student is assigned a 
faculty adviser who provides academic and professional 
guidance throughout the course of study. The 
academic advisor assists individual students to plan a 
program of study consistent with the academic 
requirements for the appropriate program and the 
academic policies of the School of Nursing and 
Columbia University. Academic advisors may also 
assist the student in career planning and development 
and are responsible for writing a summary 
performance report and recommendation for the 
School of Nursing, and record for each advisee when 
the student completes the requirements of the 
program. This summary becomes part of the 
graduate’s permanent record. 













16 


Student Records 

Student records related to admission and 
progression are maintained in the Office of Student 
Services. Transcripts are released only upon written 
authorization of the student and payment of the 
transcript fee. The request must be written; verbal 
requests will not be honored. This service is provided 
by the Office of Student Administrative Services, 
located at 630 West 168th Street, Room 141 Black 
Building, New York, NY 10032; telephone 
212-305-3992. 

All documents submitted in support of an 
application for admission become the permanent 
possession of Columbia University and cannot be 
returned or duplicated for the applicant or student. 
Access to student records according to the Buckley 
Amendment can be made through the Office of 
Student Services. In addition, students can access/ 
review information on the Worldwide Web such as 
their grades and courses (current/previous back eight 
years in duration), holds, address changes, transcript 
orders, account balances, and refund requests at: 
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/student services 

Transportation 

A free shuttle bus system operates between the 
Health Sciences and Morningside campuses, as well as 
to the Harlem Hospital Center. Travel time between 
points is approximately 15 minutes. All schedule times 
are approximate; please allow two to three minutes 
variance. There is no shuttle service on New Year’s 
Day, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (observed), 
Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, 
Thanksgiving, or Christmas Day. On Election Day, the 
Friday after Thanksgiving, and the two University 
holidays at Christmas time, the summer schedule is in 
effect. Shuttle Schedules are available in the Security 
Office. For students living in off-campus housing, the 
reduced rates for car service in the “Columbia 
Corridor” are available. Contact the Office of Student 
Services for more information. 


FINANCIAL AID 


The goal of the SON Financial Aid Office is to 
provide students with sufficient resources to meet 
their need and to distribute funds to eligible students 
in a fair and equitable manner. Scholarships, grants, 
loans, and employment opportunities are among the 
sources of financial aid that are available to students 
enrolled in the School of Nursing. 

Funds are available through a variety of sources 
including alumni and friends of the School, health care 
agencies, foundations, civic groups, voluntary 
organizations, and government agencies. 

The School endeavors to ensure that students 
meeting admission requirements will have sufficient 
funds to pursue and complete their nursing education. 
Financial assistance is determined by a careful 
evaluation of all the resources available to the student. 
All students must file a Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA). Students may apply for FAFSA 
electronically on the Internet. The Internet address is 
www.fafsa.ed.gov. Your information is transmitted 
directly to the U.S. Department of Education and 
eliminates the additional processing time associated 
with traditional paper FAFSA. This process is quicker 
and better for both you and the School of Nursing. 
The FAFSA is the only application you need for ALL 
student aid programs, including School of Nursing 
Scholarships. 

To continue receiving financial aid assistance, 
students must meet the School’s academic progression 
standards. Students in the entry-into-practice program 
must achieve a minimum grade point average of 3.0; 
students in the Masters advanced practice program 
must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 with a B or 
better in all clinical courses. Students failing to meet 
academic progression standards for any academic year 
(for financial aid purposes defined as two consecutive 
terms) are not eligible for additional financial 
assistance until the required cumulative grade average 
is achieved. Questions regarding financial aid should 
be directed to: 



FINANCIAL AID 


17 


Oscar Vasquez, Director of Financial Aid 

Columbia University School of Nursing 

617 W. 168 Street #206 

New York, NY 10032 

Tel: 212-305-8147 

Fax: 212-305-6937 

E-mail: ov3@columbia.edu 

http://cpmcnet.columbia.edu/dept.nursing/ 

Financial Aid Administered by the School 
of Nursing 

Awards are made annually, primarily on the basis 
of financial aid need. Applicants for financial aid must 
complete an application for financial assistance. The 
application must be accompanied by requested 
supporting documentation. Incomplete applications 
will not be processed. Late applications are 
considered only in exceptional circumstances and on a 
funds-available basis. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOLARSHIPS (SONS) 

The School of Nursing administers several privately 
endowed scholarships. Recipients are chosen for their 
financial need and academic performance. Students 
are expected to incur a minimum loan amount and 
part-time work before they are considered for SONS. 
School of Nursing Scholarships are limited to a 
maximum of 50% of tuition. REQUIREMENTS: The 
following policies and requirements pertain to the 
School of Nursing Scholarships (SONS). 

A student must be: 

• An undergraduate student in the ETP or AMP 
Program. 

• Full-time MATRICULATED with 12 or more 
credits (or certified as full-time by University 
Guidelines). 

• In good academic standing (3.0 GPA 

or better)with all clinical courses with a grade 
of B or better. 

• Demonstrate “need” as determined by the 
FAFSA form. 

If a student receiving SONS falls below a 3.0 GPA, 
or is placed on academic probation by the Student 


Admissions and Promotions Committee (SAPC), or 
drops courses which will place them below the 12 
credit full-time requirement, the SONS will be 
reviewed by the Financial Aid Committee and a 
determination will be made to continue, reduce or 
remove the SONS. 

Teaching Assistantships 

Teaching Assistantships are available to students in 
good academic standing enrolled in a master’s or 
doctoral program. Teaching Assistants (TA’s) receive 
tuition credit and a small stipend in return for weekly 
work assisting faculty. Teaching Assistantship activities 
include assisting with course teaching (clinical 
supervision, laboratory assistance, tutoring) special 
projects with faculty, or assisting with research or grant 
projects. Application should be made to the Dean’s 
Office. 

Nursing Student Loan 

A Nursing Student Loan is a low-interest rate loan 
(5%) for both undergraduate and graduate students 
with exceptional financial aid need. The School of 
Nursing is the lender and the loan is made with 
government funds. Loan funds are made in two equal 
disbursements, one at the beginning of the loan period 
and the second at midpoint. 

School of Nursing-Emergency Loan 

These are short term interest free loans. 

Emergency loans must be repaid as soon as possible so 
that other students with emergencies may have access 
to these funds. Applications are available in the 
Financial Aid Office. Loan is limited to $500.00. 



18 FINANCIAL AID 


FEDERAL PROGRAMS 

Federal Work-Study Program 

Provides part-time employment for students who 
demonstrate financial need and express an interest in 
working by indicating so on the SON award letter. 
Work-Study Jobs are limited and employment cannot 
be guaranteed. Students who are unable to find a 
Work-Study job will be referred to The Center for 
Career Services located at East Campus. This is a 
need-based program. Eligibility is determined from the 
information provided on the FAFSA form. 

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loans 

A Federal Subsidized student loan is awarded on 
the basis of need. The federal government pays the 
interest on the loan until repayment begins and during 
authorized periods of deferment. Students must be 
enrolled in an eligible program of study at least half¬ 
time (six credits). Undergraduate students can 
borrow up to $5,500 per year. Graduate students can 
borrow up to $8,500 per year. The interest rate is 
variable and tied to the 91-day Treasury Bill (adjusts 
every July 1). The interest rate will never exceed 
8.25%. Loan funds are made in two equal 
disbursements, one at the beginning of the loan period 
and the second at midpoint. All borrowers must pay 
an origination and guarantee fee equal 4%, deducted 
proportionately from each disbursement of your loan. 
Applications must be submitted to the Financial Aid 
Office approximately two months before the date 
funds are needed. 

Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loans 

A Federal Unsubsidized Loan is not awarded on 
the basis of need. You’ll be charged interest from the 
time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. The 
interest may be deferred until repayment begins. 
Undergraduate students can borrow up to $5,000 per 
year. Graduate students can borrow up to $10,000 
per year. The interest rate is variable and tied to the 


91-day Treasury Bill (adjusts every July 1). The 
interest rate will never exceed 8.25%. Loan funds are 
made in two equal disbursements, one at the 
beginning of the loan period and the second at 
midpoint. All borrowers must pay an origination and 
guarantee fee equal to 4%, deducted proportionately 
from each disbursement of your loan. Applications 
must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office 
approximately two months before the date funds are 
needed. 

Federal Perkins Loan 

A Federal Perkins Loan is a low-interest rate loan 
(5%) for both undergraduate and graduate students 
with exceptional financial aid need. The School of 
Nursing is the lender and the loan is made with 
government funds. Loan funds are made in two equal 
disbursements, one at the beginning of the loan period 
and the second at midpoint. 

Federal Parent Loan (PLUS) 

Available to parents of dependent students. 

Parents with good credit histories may borrow the 
total cost of education (for the student) minus any 
financial aid. Parents are responsible for interest 
accrued while the student is in school and have the 
option of paying the interest or of having it capitalized 
(added to the principal). 

The interest rate is variable, but will never exceed 
9%. The rate is adjusted each year on July 1. Parents 
will pay an origination and guarantee fee equal to 4% 
of the loan amount. Applications should be submitted 
to the Financial Aid Office approximately two months 
before the date funds are needed. 



FINANCIAL AID 19 


NEW YORK STATE PROGRAMS 

New York State and other states offer a variety of 
grants. Although applications are made directly to the 
state and grants are awarded by the state, the amount 
each student is expected to receive is estimated and 
taken into account by the School of Nursing when 
preparing the student’s financial aid package. 

Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) 

Legal residents of the State of New York who are 
enrolled in a full-time degree program may be eligible 
for awards under this program. Awards vary 
depending on the applicant’s net income and tuition 
costs. TAP applications are available at the Financial 
Aid Office. 

Regents Professional Opportunity Scholarship 

Awards range from $1,000 - $5,000 per year for 
up to four years of study. To be eligible you must be 
enrolled in a full-time Master’s Program. You must be 
a resident of New York State and a citizen, or 
qualifying non-citizen, of the United States. Upon 
completion of study, you must work 1 year for each 
annual payment received. 

New York State Primary Health Care Scholarship 

Competitive scholarships up to $15,000 per year 
for 2 years of full-time and part-time study. Awarded 
annually to students studying to become Nurse 
Midwives and Nurse Practitioners. Selection is based 
on academic achievement, previous work experience 
in your chosen profession, and demonstrated interest 
in working for a state-operated facility. 

Applications are available at the financial aid office. 


ALTERNATIVE FINANCING 


Signature Student Loan 

The Signature Student Loan is a private loan you 
can apply for along with a Federal Stafford loan. 
Private loans can be supplement funding received 
through Federal loan programs to help you meet the 
cost of education. We also offer the Signature Health 
Loan for health profession students. Call 1-800-695- 
3317 for more information or to start your application 
over the phone. 

Eligibility: 

• Enrolled or admitted at least half-time at a Sallie- 
Mae approved four-year non-profit college or 
university. 

• U.S. citizen or a national (foreign students must 
apply with a credit-worthy U.S. citizen or 
permanent resident as cosigner). 

• Making satisfactory academic progress. 

Loan Limits: 

• Annual: Cost of education minus other aid 
received. 

• Lifetime: $100,000 in original principal from 
private loans. 

Interest Rate: 

• Check out our current rates. Interest is capitalized 
at repayment. Call 1-800-695-3317. 

Repayment: 

• Term: up to 15 years. 

• Minimum payment: $50 per month per loan. 

• Begins: 6 months after borrower graduates, leaves 
school or drops below half-time enrollment. 

• Options: In addition to a standard payment plan, 
borrowers may choose to make interest only 
payments for the first 2 or 4 years of repayment 
with a Select Step Account. 

Benefits: 

• Sallie Mae’s money-saving interest rate reductions 
include the Signature Rewards Program and the 
Direct Repay Plan. 

Supplemental fees: 

• 0% Fees 



20 


Admission 


Applicants may apply to the School of Nursing as 
candidates for a degree or advanced certificate, or as 
non-degree students. Additional information may be 
obtained by writing or telephoning: 

Office of Student Services 
Columbia University School of Nursing 

630 West 168th Street 
New York, NY 10032 
(212) 305-5756 
(212) 305-3680 Fax 

ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

An applicant for admission must complete the 
form in the application packet. The completed form 
must be accompanied by the application fee: a check 
or money order made payable to Columbia University: 
$75 for non-doctoral programs; $100 for doctoral 
programs. This fee helps to cover the cost of 
processing the application; it is therefore not refundable, 
nor is it credited toward tuition. Applications received 
without the required application fee will not be processed. 
Applicants are responsible for the submission of all 
required admission materials. 

All applications for admission are evaluated on the 
basis of the following materials: 

1. An application form which includes a typed, 250 to 
300-word personal statement describing 
professional goals and aspirations. 

2. Official transcripts from all postsecondary 
institutions attended. 

3. Official documentation of Graduate Record 
Examination or Miller Analogies Test scores. 

4. Three letters of reference. 

5. Applicants whose education was not in English 
must submit the results of their performance on 
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL ). 

Individual consideration is given to those applicants 
who do not meet specific requirements for admission. 
Acceptance of a student for admission is based 


on individual evaluation of character, past experience, 
and potential for graduate study, as well as on the 
fulfillment of academic requirements. 

All applicants to the School of Nursing are 
evaluated and judged on an individual basis and a 
determination made as to whether the applicant has 
the qualifications necessary to perform all the essential 
requirements of the program safely, effectively and 
independently. Where appropriate, the school makes 
reasonable accommodations for otherwise qualified 
students with disabilities. 

Applications may be submitted at any time. 
Faculty review applications on a rolling basis. 

All applications not completed within nine 
months will be automatically inactivated and 
reapplication is required for further 
consideration. Applications will not be held 
more than one year. 

A complete application includes: 

1. Application and non-refundable fee. 

(All applications received without fee will not be 
processed). 

2. Personal Statement. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. Official transcripts. 

5. Official Test Scores (GRE, MAT, TOEFL). 

6. Copy of Nursing License for the RN student. 

All documents submitted in support of an 
application for admission become the permanent 
possession of Columbia University and cannot be 
returned to the applicant. 

Admission to the Entry-To-Practice Master’s 
Program for Non-Nurse College Graduates (ETP) 

The Entry-To-Practice program is an accelerated 
combined degree (B.S./M.S.) program for Non-Nurse 
College Graduates. CUSN grants both a BS degree in 
nursing as well as an MS degree in a nursing specialty. 



ADMISSION 21 


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. A baccalaureate degree from a regionally 
accredited college or university, with a cumulative 
grade point average of > 3.0 (on a scale of 4.0) is 
required for admission. Credit distribution must 
include: 

• English Composition, 3 credits 

• Life Sciences (Biology, Microbiology and 
Biochemistry recommended), 9-12 credits 

• Psychology, 3 credits 

• Humanities, 6 credits 

• Statistics, 3 credits 

• Social/Behavioral Sciences, 6 credits 

2. Successful completion of the Miller Analogies Test 
(MAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 
Waived for applicants with previous master’s 
degrees. 

3. Three references. 

4. Personal Statement which describes your 
professional goals. 

5. Official transcripts from all post secondary schools. 

Admission to the Accelerated Master’s Program 
(RN/AMP) 

The Accelerated Master’s Program (AMP) is a 
combined degree (BS/MS) program that recognizes 
the clinical knowledge and experience of practicing 
registered nurses (RNs). 

AMP is designed to further the educational and 
career goals of RNs who already hold an associate’s 
degree in nursing. The Columbia University School of 
Nursing grants both a B.S. degree in nursing and a 
M.S. degree in clinical specialty. With full-time study, 
the combined program can be completed in five 
semesters. Part-time study is also available. 

RNs with an ADN and a non-nursing 
baccalaureate may also apply -sixteen credits of upper- 
division nursing courses are taken before progressing 
to the MS major. 


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. An associate degree in nursing from a National 
League for Nursing accredited program with a 
cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 
scale of 4.0. 

2. A current license to practice as a registered nurse 
in the United States. 

3. One year experience preferable but not necessary. 

4. Three current references including at least one 
from an immediate nursing supervisor. 

5. Personal Statement which describes your 
professional goals. 

6. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools. 

Admission to the Graduate Program 

The Master’s Program is designed to prepare 

baccalaureate nurses for advanced practice. A M.S. 

degree is awarded upon completion of this program. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. A bachelor’s degree with a nursing major from a 
program accredited by the National League for 
Nursing or Commission on Collegiate Nursing 
Education with a cumulative GPA of > 3.0 on a 
4.0 scale. 

2. A current license to practice as a registered nurse 
in the United States. 

3. One year of experience in a clinical practice 
related to the clinical specialty major courses for 
study. (Obstretrical nursing, preferably 
intrapartum, is required to nurse-midwifery; 
critical care nursing is required for nurse 
anesthesia.) 

4. An undergraduate course in statistics. 
Undergraduate courses in general chemistry 
(which includes organic chemistry), and biology 
(which includes biochemistry), or the equivalent, 
are strongly suggested for the nurse anesthesia 
major. 

5. A course in basic physical assessment skills. If 
integrated in the undergraduate course of study, 
evidence must be submitted for evaluation. 



22 ADMISSION 


6. Successful completion of the Miller Analogies Test 
(MAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 

7. Personal Statement which describes your 
professional goals. 

8. Three current references including at least one 
from an immediate nursing supervisor. 

9. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools. 

Admission of Nurses with Non-Nursing 
Baccalaureate Degrees to the Master’s Program 

Under special circumstances, registered nurses 
with degrees in health-related fields other than nursing 
may be enrolled in the clinical specialty master’s 
program. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Graduation from a National League for Nursing 
accredited associate degree program. 

2. A baccalaureate degree in a health-related field 
from a regionally accredited college or university 
with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 on a 
scale of 4.0. 

3. One year of clinical practice related to the clinical 
specialty major chosen for study. 



4. Three current references to include at least one 
from an immediate nursing supervisor. 

5. A current license to practice as a registered nurse 
in the United States. 

6. An undergraduate course in statistics and evidence 
of undergraduate course work in research. 

7. A course in basic physical assessment. 

8. Successful completion of the MAT or the GRE. 

9. Personal Statement - Reflective of previous 
education and experience in Nursing Research, 
Community Health and Leadership. 

10. Official transcripts from all post-secondary 
institutions attended. 

Admission to the Advanced Certificate Program 

The Advanced Certificate program is designed to 
prepare Master’s prepared nurses in advanced 
practice. Areas of study include Adult, Geriatric, 
Neonatal*, Pediatric, Family, Women’s Health, 
Oncology, Nurse-Midwifery, and Psychiatric Mental 
Health Nursing. Graduates of the practitioner 
program are qualified to apply to New York State for 
Certification. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Baccalaureate and master’s degree with a major in 
nursing from a program accredited by the National 
League for Nursing or Commission on Collegiate 
Nursing Education with a cumulative grade point 
average of > 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

2. Personal Statement which describes your 
professional goals. 

3. Minimum of one year’s experience in nursing. 

4. A current license to practice as a registered nurse 
in the United States. 

5. Three references current references to include at 
least one from an immediate nursing supervisor. 

6. Student must secure a new site and preceptor for 
primary care student practice that is acceptable to 
the program director. A formal contract with the 
site and preceptor will be required as a part of 
admission documentation. 












ADMISSION 23 


7. Official transcripts from all post-secondary 
institutions attended. 

* Call the Office of Student Services for the 
status of Neonatal. 

Admission to the Doctoral Program 

The Doctor of Nursing Science (DNSc) program 
will provide nurses with a foundation in the science 
and research methodology for the professional 
discipline and practice of nursing. Admission is 
competitive and based upon the following: 

1. A master’s degree in nursing from an N.L.N. or 
CCNE accredited program. 

2. A minimum of a 3.0 GPA at the undergraduate 
level and 3.5 at the graduate level on a 4.0 scale. 

3. Satisfactory scores on the GRE or MAT taken in 
the last five years. 

4. Personal statement of goals, and research interest. 

5. A personal interview with doctoral faculty. 
Interviews are scheduled by invitation, and only 
following a preliminary faculty review of the 
completed application. 

6. Current license to practice in the United States. 

7. Course work in statistics, nursing theory, health 
policy, and research methods. 

8. Three references, (at least two from faculty who 
can address academic potential) 

9. Evidence of professional practice, research, and 
scholarly activities. 

10. Official transcripts from all undergraduate and 
graduate institutions attended. 

Admission of International Students 

Persons from other countries who meet admission 
criteria may apply for admission to the School of 
Nursing. Applicants are encouraged to apply at least 
six months prior to the expected term of admission if 
the applicant is currently in residence in the United 
States, or one year, if the applicant is out of the 
country. This amount of time is needed for evaluation 
of transcripts by the International Student Office. If 


the applicant has a baccalaureate degree in nursing, it 
is necessary to determine congruence with an NLN 
accredited baccalaureate program. 

International applicants whose schooling was not in 
English must submit TOEFL scores (Test of English as a 
Foreign Language). Applicants with scores below 600 
must enroll in the American Language Program located 
on Columbia University’s Morningside campus. 

International students who are not permanent 
residents are not eligible for School of Nursing 
financial aid or federal loans. 

All international students must possess a license to 
practice as a registered nurse in the United States 
prior to acceptance. 

Admission as a Non-Degree Student 

Under special circumstances, students who do not 
meet all the admission requirements may be admitted 
as non-matriculant (non-degree students). Enrollment 
as a non-degree student is limited to three terms, or 
completion of 15 points, whichever comes first. A 
minimum grade point average of 3.0 is required. The 
non-degree student admitted to degree candidacy may 
be awarded a maximum of 15 points of credit for 
courses taken as a non-matriculant. 

Non-degree students are permitted to enroll on 
a space-available basis, and are not eligible to 
register for clinical specialty courses. Preference is 
given to non-degree applicants whose undergraduate 
cumulative grade point average is 3.0 on a scale of 4.0. 
Non-degree students must apply for admission; “walk- 
in” registration is not permitted. Non-degree students 
are not eligible for School of Nursing financial aid or 
loans. All non-degree students must apply for 
matriculation before the completion of 15 credits of 
course work. Successful course work as a non-degree 
student does not ensure admission to degree candidacy. 



24 ADMISSION 


Non-Degree Student Admission Requirements: 

1. Submission of an application and $75 non- 
refundable application fee. 

2. Official transcripts from all post-secondary 
institutions attended. 

3. One reference. 

4. Personal Statement. 

Admission Testing Information 

Testing information can be obtained by writing or 
calling: 

MAT 

Miller Analogies Test Coordinator 
The Psychological Corporation 
555 Academic Court 
San Antonio, TX 78204 
800-228-0752 

GRE 

Graduate Record Examination 
Educational Testing Service 
P.O. Box 6000 
Princeton, NJ 08541-6000 
609-771-7670 

TOEFL 

TOEFL/TSE Services 
Educational Testing Service 
P.O. Box 6151 
Princeton, NJ 08541-6151 
609-951-1100 


ADVANCED STANDING AND EXEMPTION 

Advanced standing for a course already 
successfully completed elsewhere may be granted on 
an individual basis to students as either transfer credits 
or credit by exam. Transfer credits are based on 
documentation of comparable coursework at an 
accredited college, university, or graduate school. 
Credit by exam is obtained by passing an exam given 
by the Columbia University School of Nursing. A 
grade of B or better is necessary in order for credit to 
be awarded for advanced standing. Credits awarded 
will not exceed the number of credits for the course at 
the School of Nursing, regardless of the number of 
credits taken earlier. If the number of credits taken 
earlier is less than the course at the School of Nursing, 
the additional credits must be made up through 
additional coursework at the School of Nursing. The 
course may not have been applied to an earlier 
degree. In this case, a student may apply for an 
exemption from the School of Nursing’s course. No 
credit is awarded for the exemption. Credits equal to 
the number of credits of the exemption must be taken 
in other coursework at the School of Nursing. 

In order for course(s) taken at another school to 
be considered for either advanced standing or 
exemption, the syllabus for the course and a written 
request must be submitted to the Office of Student 
Services. This request MUST be submitted during the 
first semester the student is enrolled at the School of 
Nursing. An official transcript documenting the course 
and grade received is also required. The Assistant 
Dean for Student Services will review the materials 
and forward eligible requests to the faculty responsible 
for the course. Both advanced standing and 
exemption are granted at the discretion of the faculty. 



ADMISSION 25 


No more than nine (9) credits of coursework 
(completed within the last five years) will be accepted 
for advanced standing while a student at the School of 
Nursing. Of these nine (9) credits, a maximum of six 
(6) may be transfer credits. Only courses taken 
before enrolling at the School of Nursing will 
be considered. Credits taken at another school 
while enrolled in the Columbia University School of 
Nursing are NOT eligible for transfer. Transfer credits 
carry no fee for processing, but credit by exam has a 
fee of $125 per credit. This fee is required at the time 
of the request and is not dependent upon successful 
completion of the exam. There will be no refund for 
failure to pass the exam. 

Exemptions to the above are as follows: 

• AMP students who began Phase I in the Fall of 1999: 
15 credits of electives and 3 credits of statistics will 
continue to be transfer credits as they are an 
integral part of the program. 

• MS completion program: 15 credits by exam for 
national certification in the specialty will continue to 
be awarded. 

• DNSc students: coursework taken outside of 
Columbia University, while enrolled as a student at 
the School, will be accepted as a transfer credit if it 
is essential to the student’s area of study and similar 
coursework is not offered within the University. 



REGISTRATION 

Before attending University courses, each new 
student must register in person during the registration 
period (see Academic Calendar). Once registered as a 
student, you must comply with all regulations set by 
the University. The registration procedure is as follows: 

1. Students must have their program plans approved 
by an adviser. 

2. Program Plan is submitted to the Office of Student 
Services. It is the responsibility of the student to 
ensure that he or she has a current Program Plan 
on file with the Office of Student Services. 

3. Students complete various forms for the Office of 
Student Services and provide information required 
for University records. 

Continuing students are pre-registered by the 
Office of Student Services. This pre-registration is 
based on the program plan on file with the Office. 
Students may verify this registration on-line or by 
checking their tuition bill. If a change needs to be 
made, it can be done by phone during the Add/Drop 
period. It is imperative that the program plan 
on file is accurate. If changes are made, the 
student must submit a revised program plan 
to the Office of Student Services. 

If there is a Hold on a continuing student’s Bursar 
account at the time of pre-registration, the student will 
not be registered. The student must then register by 
phone during the regular registration period. 

Registration material will be mailed to each student 
4-6 weeks before the regular registration period. If a 
packet is not received during this time, the student 
must contact the Office of Student Services 
immediately. All students must be officially 
registered in order to attend classes. 

The following items must be submitted to the 
Office of Student Services before a student is 
permitted to register officially: 

1. Program Plan. 

2. Proof of current Malpractice (Professional Liability) 
Insurance (for RN students). 

3. Current license (for RN students) or eligibility 
statement and/or current license (for graduate 
students). 








26 ADMISSION 


4. Verification of submission of completed health 
form to Health Service (212-795-4181). 

5. Verification of immunization for measles, mumps, 
rubella and varicella. 

6. Verification of receipt of hepatitis B vaccine, or 
waiver. 

7. Additional health requirements as determined by 
the School. 

Failure to submit all required documents will 
prevent a student from registering. 

All students are asked to give Social Security 
numbers when registering in the University. 
International students will have one term in which to 
secure a valid Social Security number. International 
students should consult the International Student and 
Scholars Office, 525 Riverside Drive, for further 
information. Other students who do not have a Social 
Security number should obtain one from their local 
Social Security office well in advance of registration. 

Students who are not citizens of the United States 
and who need authorization for special billing of 
tuition and/or fees to foreign institutions, agencies, or 
sponsors should go to the International Student 
Adviser with two copies of the sponsorship letter. 
Special billing authorization is required of students 
whose bills are to be sent to a third party for payment. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 27 


Academic Regulations 


Program Plans 

Upon admission to a degree program, each 
student is assigned a faculty adviser (non-degree 
students are advised by the Assistant Dean for Student 
Services). The adviser is available for academic 
counseling and assistance in planning a program of 
study. 

All students must complete a Program Plan that 
details the time frame in which the student will 
complete degree requirements. The student must 
submit a copy of this plan to the Office of Student 
Services. This plan will be the basis of pre-registration 
for continuing students. If changes are made to this 
plan, it is the responsibility of this student to submit a 
copy of the revised plan to the Office of Student 
Services. 

Course Changes 

Once registered, a student may drop or add 
courses or change sections by phone during the 
change-of-program period each term (see Academic 
Calendar for specific dates). All such changes must 
first be approved by the student’s adviser. 

Students may drop courses after the change-of- 
program period by filing a formal Add/Drop form 
with the Office of Student Services. The signature of 
the student’s adviser and the Assistant Dean for 
Student Services is required. However, for individual 
courses or program dropped after the last day for 
change of program in each term, no adjustment of 
tuition will be made (see Academic Calendar for specific 
dates). 

Failure to attend classes or notification to the instructor 
does not constitute dropping a course and will result in a 
failing grade in the course. Students are responsible for all 
tuition costs and fees in this instance. 


Academic Standing 

A cumulative grade point average (G.P.A.) of 3.0 
or above in all courses is considered to be an 
indication of good academic standing. Failure of any 
course requires repeating the course. In addition, at 
the discretion of the program director, a grade of B- or 
lower in a clinical major course may require repeating 
the course. Students who fail two courses will be 
withdrawn from the program. 

Students not in good academic standing are 
reviewed by the Student Admissions and Promotions 
Committee (SAPC). At the discretion of the 
committee, the student may be allowed to remain in 
the program with conditions, be placed on academic 
probation for one term, or be withdrawn from the 
program. Appeals of a withdrawal decision made by 
the Student Admissions and Promotions Committee 
must be made in writing to the Dean within 10 days of 
receiving the withdrawal letter. The School of Nursing 
reserves the right to withhold the degree or to 
withdraw any student not in good academic standing. 

The student placed on academic probation is 
expected to consult with the faculty adviser for 
guidance in determining actions necessary to improve 
performance. It is the responsibility of the 
student to initiate and maintain this 
consultation. Students on academic probation will 
be reviewed at the end of the first term following 
probation. Students who have not shown 
improvement or who fail to meet school standards 
may be withdrawn. 

Students in need of tutoring in a specific subject 
should see the Assistant Dean for Student Services. 



28 


ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 


Evaluation and Grading 

The evaluation system provides for the assessment 
of the student’s performance, progress, and 
achievement within each course. In theory courses, 
performance is evaluated by means of examinations 
and/or written and oral assignments. For each clinical 
rotation, written clinical evaluations are prepared by 
preceptors and clinical instructors. Faculty use this 
data to assess students’ needs and abilities and to plan 
and implement appropriate learning experiences. 
Students are informed of their progress by faculty in 
individual courses at intervals during each academic 
year. Grade reports are available on-line on the 
Columbia University web page. 

The grading system of the School of Nursing is as 
follows: A+ or A, excellent; A- or B+, good; B or B-, 
average; C+ or C, passing; C-, poor but passing; F, 
failure. Clinical grades are as follows: A, excellent; B, 
passing; F, failure. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
requires that the student repeat the course, resign, or 
may be withdrawn by the School. Students who fail a 
course but are permitted to remain in the program will 
be placed on academic probation for the term 
following the course failure. 

The grade of F* is assigned to a student who 
discontinues attendance in a course without formally 
notifying Student Administrative Services, or who has 
an incomplete for more than a year. 

The mark of INC (incomplete) is granted at the 
discretion of the instructor only under special 
circumstances. Deadlines for completion of course 
work should be arranged between instructor and 
student. Under no circumstances shall this time limit 
exceed one year. If work is still not submitted after 
one year, the INC becomes an F*. A student with 
more than two marks of INC on his or her record will 
not be permitted to register for the following term and 
may be withdrawn from the School. Students on 
academic probation cannot be granted a grade of INC. 

In the computation of grade point averages, marks 
for courses are awarded quality points on the following 


scale: A =4.0, B =3.0, C =2.0, F =0. For each plus or 
minus unit an adjustment of +0.3 or -0.3 is made, 
respectively. Students in all programs must maintain a 
cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better. 
Consult the Office of Student Services for details. 

Grades will be recorded only for students who are 
officially registered for the course. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 29 


Dean’s List 

During each academic term, students in Phase I of 
the Entry to Practice Program who have earned an 
average of 3.7 or higher in 12 or more points of letter 
credit for the preceding term are placed on the Dean’s 
List. Students who have received grades of D, F, or 
INC, during the term are not eligible for consideration. 
Any student who has earned an A- average but has 
failed to receive notification at the appropriate time of 
having been placed on the Dean’s List should notify 
Student Administrative Services. Any student who has 
been on academic probation is also ineligible. 

Attendance and Leave of Absence 

In education for a profession, learning is the basis 
for practice as well as knowledge. Therefore, regular 
class attendance is an important part of professional 
responsibility, and students are expected to attend all 
scheduled classes in every course for which they are 
registered. The privilege of attending any course in 
the School of Nursing is granted only to students who 
are officially registered in the University. Requirements 
for class attendance within individual courses are at the 
discretion of the faculty member in charge of the 
course, and students are responsible for meeting those 
specific requirements. Also, attendance at skills 
laboratories and clinical sites is required. 

Columbia University regulations mandate 
attendance at the first class meeting unless excused. 

All degree candidates are required to register until 
they have completed all the course requirements for 
their degrees. A student who wishes to interrupt his 
or her registration in any of the schools of the 
University must be granted a leave of absence by the 
Assistant Dean of Student Services or by his or her 
appointee. A leave of absence usually may not exceed 
one academic year. A leave of absence is granted only 
for compelling reasons (military, medical, religious 
obligations). See the Student Handbook for more 
detailed information. 


Absence from the University for a semester or an 
academic year without formal approval of leave of 
absence may result in withdrawal of the student from 
the School. Continuation at a later date will require a 
reapplication for admission to the University through 
the Office of Student Services. 

Withdrawal 

A student considering withdrawing from the 
University should consult the faculty adviser to discuss 
his or her reasons. If the student then decides to 
withdraw, he or she must go to the Office of Student 
Services with accompanying documents to complete 
the appropriate forms. Unless official notice is 
received, there is no tuition refund and a grade of F* 
(failure due to unofficial withdrawal) will appear on the 
transcript for each course in that term. A student who 
has withdrawn must petition for readmission. 

Tuition adjustment is based on the date the 
student’s notice of withdrawal is received. The 
Student Health Service fee is refundable on a prorated 
basis. Students may elect to retain coverage. For 
additional information on tuition and fees adjustment, 
see Withdrawal and Adjustment of Fees or contact the 
Office of Bursar Operations in the Black Building. 



30 ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 


Suspension 

Any student can be suspended from attending class 
or clinical sessions, or from school entirely, by the 
Assistant Dean for Student Services, in consultation 
with the Dean, for any behavior determined to be 
unprofessional, unethical, unsafe, or illegal. 

Such behaviors may include but are not limited to: 
alcohol or substance abuse, theft or deliberate 
destruction of property, verbal or physical abuse to 
others, the falsifying or copying of medical records, or 
the placing of patients in physical or emotional 
jeopardy. 

Students who are suspended for any reason will be 
referred to the Student Admissions and Promotions 
Committee. The members of this committee, in 
consultation with the Assistant Dean for Student 
Services, will determine the next appropriate action. 
This determination will go as a recommendation to the 
Dean for a final decision. 

Dismissal 

Any student can be dismissed at any time from the 
School of Nursing by the Dean for any behavior 
determined to be unprofessional, unethical, unsafe, or 
illegal, or for performance that is unsuitable for the 
practice of nursing. 


Readmission 

Students who have not been registered for one 
academic year or who have withdrawn from the 
University must file readmission forms and submit a 
non-refundable application fee of $75 through the 
Office of Student Services. This fee is subject to 
change annually. Additional credentials may be 
required. Students must have been in good academic 
standing when they withdrew in order to be 
readmitted. 

Students on academic probation who have not 
registered for one term must file for readmission. 
Readmission is at the discretion of the Student 
Admissions and Promotions Committee. 

All readmission requests must be received by the 
Office of Student Services by October 1 for the spring 
term, April 1 for the autumn term, and February 1 for 
the summer term. All students requesting readmission 
must seek the approval of their program director. 

Inquiries for further information and requests for 
application forms should be addressed to the Office of 
Student Services, School of Nursing, Columbia 
University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, 

NY 10032. 


Appeal of Suspension or Dismissal 

Any student suspended or dismissed from the 
School of Nursing has the right to appeal the decision. 
The appeal must be made in writing to the Dean 
within 10 days of receiving the dismissal letter. 
Normally, on such an appeal, the Dean of the School 
of Nursing relies solely upon the written record and 
does not conduct a new factual investigation. 
Moreover, the Dean focuses upon whether, in the 
Dean’s view, the decision made and the action 
imposed are reasonable under all of the circumstances 
of the case. There is no further appeal within the 
University. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 31 


Graduation 

Students who satisfactorily complete the 
prescribed course of study including successful 
completion of the master’s project or comprehensive 
examination and have a cumulative grade point average 
of at least 3.0 are recommended for the award of the 
B.S., M.S., or DNSc degree. Degrees are awarded in 
February, May, and October. A University-wide 
commencement ceremony is held each May on the 
Morningside campus. All students are urged to attend 
this gala event. Candidates for degrees are presented 
by their respective Deans, and the President of the 
University publicly confers the degrees. The School of 
Nursing holds an exercise in May at which degree 
candidates are recognized. Students must file a degree 
application with the University. University deadlines 
for filing degree applications are as follows: August 1 
for October degrees; December 1 for February 
degrees; February 1 for May degrees. 

Those who expect to receive a degree must satisfy 
academic requirements, meet their fiscal obligations to 
the University, and return all library books and 
University property. The Office of Student 
Administrative Services will not release the diploma 
and transcript of any student who does not meet these 
graduation requirements. The School of Nursing 
reserves the right to withhold the degree of any 
student deemed unsuitable for the practice of nursing. 

It is the student’s responsibility to make sure that they 
have met all degree requirements before graduation. 

Professional Integrity 

Honor is a sense of personal satisfaction and 
worthiness derived from a confidence in one’s values. 
This sense of honor is an integral part of living and, as 
such, influences one’s thinking so that one understands 
and exhibits integrity and respect for individuals and 
groups, and also assumes responsibility for one’s 
actions as a professional. 


Each student at the Columbia University School of 
Nursing is expected to abide by the honor code that 
requires academic and professional integrity. As 
complete integrity is expected when one assumes the 
care of others, it is vital that we be honest with 
ourselves, other members of the health team, and our 
patients with respect to professional judgment. As 
students and faculty, we become members of a group. 
To encourage a constant awareness of this group 
identity, each student and faculty member is expected 
to assume responsibility for his or her own actions 
within the framework of ethically oriented professional 
and academic values. 

STUDENT RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

Guidelines on Alcohol 

Alcoholic beverages are not permitted at any 
student event sponsored by the School of Nursing. 
Alcoholic beverages are not permitted in any class or 
clinical area, nor are students allowed to attend class 
or clinical practice under the influence of alcohol. 

Guidelines on Smoking 

Columbia University maintains a smoke-free 
environment. Smoking is permitted only in private 
rooms in housing facilities. 

Guidelines on Substance Abuse 

The possession, distribution, manufacture, or use 
of any illegal drug is not permitted. Students 
suspected of using illegal substances may be asked to 
submit to voluntary urine screening for substances as a 
condition of progression. Additional information on 
student impairment may be found in the Student 
Handbook. 



32 


Official Regulations 


RESERVATION OF UNIVERSITY RIGHTS 

This bulletin is intended for the guidance of 
persons applying for or considering application for 
admission to Columbia University and for the guidance 
of Columbia students and faculty. The bulletin sets 
forth in general the manner in which the University 
intends to proceed with respect to the matters set 
forth herein, but the University reserves the right to 
depart without notice from the terms of this bulletin. 
This bulletin is not intended to be and should not be 
regarded as a contract between the University and any 
student or other person. 

REGISTRATION STATUS 

According to University regulations, each person 
whose registration has been completed will be 
considered a student of the University during the term 
for which he or she is registered unless the student’s 
connection with the University is officially severed by 
withdrawal or otherwise. No student registered in any 
school or college of the University shall at the same 
time be registered in any other school or college, 
either of Columbia University or of any other 
institution, without the specific authorization of the 
dean or director of the school or college of the 
University in which he or she is first registered. 

The privileges of the University are not available to 
any student until he or she has completed registration. 
A student who is not officially registered for a 
University course may not attend the course unless 
granted auditing privileges. No student may register 
after the stated period unless he or she obtains the 
written consent of the appropriate dean or director. 

The University reserves the right to withhold the 
privilege of registration or any other University 
privilege from any person with unpaid debtedness to 
the University. 


ATTENDANCE AND LENGTH OF 
RESIDENCE 

No degree will be granted to a student who has 
not registered for and attended the University courses 
of instruction equivalent to at least one academic year 
of full-time work (30 credits). 

Students are held accountable for absences 
incurred due to late enrollment and are expected to 
attend punctually each class or laboratory exercise in 
each course. For credit toward the degree, regular 
attendance is required in addition to the proficiency 
attested by class work and examination. 

RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS 

It is the policy of the University to respect its 
members’ religious beliefs. In compliance with New 
York State law, each student who is absent from 
school because of his or her religious beliefs will be 
given an equivalent opportunity to register for classes 
or make up any examination, study, or work 
requirements that he or she may have missed because 
of such absence on any particular day or days. No 
student will be penalized for absence due to religious 
beliefs, and alternative means will be sought for 
satisfying the academic requirements involved. 

Officers of administration and of instruction 
responsible for the scheduling of required academic 
activities or essential services are expected to avoid 
conflict with religious holidays as much as possible. If a 
suitable arrangement cannot be worked out between 
the student and the instructor involved, they should 
consult the appropriate dean or director. If an 
additional appeal is needed, it may be taken to 
the Provost. 



OFFICIAL REGULATIONS 33 


ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

In addition to Dean’s discipline, each school or 
division of the University has established standards of 
academic progress and requirements for remaining in 
academic good standing. Progress and standing are 
monitored by the Dean’s Office of the School of 
Nursing. 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of 
the University, the receipt of academic credits, 
graduation, and the conferring of any degree are 
strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of 
the University. 


RULES OF UNIVERSITY CONDUCT 

The Rules of University Conduct (Chapter XLI of 
the Statutes of the University) provide special 
disciplinary rules applicable to demonstrations, rallies, 
picketing, and the circulation of petitions. These rules 
are designed to protect the rights of free expression 
through peaceful demonstration, while at the same 
time ensuring the proper functioning of the University 
and the protection of the rights of those who may be 
affected by such demonstrations. 

The Rules of University Conduct are University¬ 
wide and supersede all other rules of any school or 
division. Minor violations of the Rules of Conduct are 
referred to the normal disciplinary procedures of each 
school or division (“Dean’s discipline”). A student 
who is charged with a serious violation of the Rules 
has the option of choosing Dean’s discipline or a more 
formal hearing procedure provided in the Rules. 

All University faculty, students, and staff are 
responsible for compliance with the Rules of University 
Conduct. Copies of the full text are available in 
FACETS, the University student handbook online at: 
(www.columbia.edu/cu/facets) and at the Office of 
the University Senate, 406 Low Memorial Library. 


POLICY STATEMENT ON 
DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT 

The following statement was adopted by 
the University Senate on April 27, 1990. As a 

great center of learning, Columbia University prides 
itself on being a community committed to free and 
open discourse and to tolerance of differing views. 

We take pride, too, in preparing the leaders of our 
society and exemplifying the values we hope they will 
uphold. These commitments are subverted by 
intolerance, bigotry and harassment. Even in recent 
history, we must recognize, race, ethnicity, religion, 
gender, sexual orientation, disability and other 
irrelevancies have all occasioned attacks by the 
ignorant, the foolish, the sick, the evil. Instead of 
enjoying our differences and the richness they bring to 
our shared lives, some have chosen to make those 
differences the targets of anger and hate. As a 
community, we are committed to the principle that 
individuals are to be treated as human beings rather 
than dehumanized by treatment as members of a 
category that represents only one aspect of their 
identity. 



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34 OFFICIAL REGULATIONS 


This University resolutely condemns conduct that 
makes such targets of our differences. The free 
exchange of ideas central to the University can take 
place only in an environment that is based on equal 
opportunity for admission to academic and other 
programs and to employment, and on freedom from 
behavior that stigmatizes or victimizes others. All 
decisions concerning an individual’s admission to or 
participation in any University program must be based 
on that individual’s qualifications, free of stigmatizing 
consideration of race, color, national or ethnic origin, 
religion, disability, gender, sexual orientation, marital 
status, age, citizenship status, or Vietnam era or 
disabled veteran status. Nor will Columbia tolerate 
any behavior that harasses members of the community 
on the basis of any of these qualities. Such behavior 
will be regarded as a violation of the standards of 
conduct required of any person associated with the 
University and will subject the person guilty of it to the 
full range of internal institutional discipline, including 
permanent separation. While mediation and 
consensual resolution are of course to be encouraged, 
we also recognize the right of all persons who believe 
themselves to have been the targets of such behavior 
to institute a formal grievance. Coercion to require 
them to overlook or retract their complaints fosters 
discrimination and harassment and is equally 
intolerable in the community. 

It is not enough to be prepared to respond when 
ugliness appears. Members of a community such as 
ours must work preventively as well, to ensure that all 
our dealings with each other are marked by decency 
and characterized by civility. Columbia is committed 
to do what it can to engender mutual respect, 
understanding, and empathy. The University 
acknowledges a special responsibility to develop 
sensitivity to the concerns of those among us most 
vulnerable to discrimination and harassment. 


STATEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATORY 
POLICIES 

The University is publishing the following 
statements in accordance with certain Federal, State, 
and local statutes and administrative regulations: 

Consistent with the requirements of Title IX of the 
Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, and 
regulations thereunder, the University does not 
discriminate on the basis of sex in the conduct or 
operation of its education programs or activities 
(including employment therein and admission thereto). 
Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX may be 
referred to Ms. Beth Wilson, Assistant Provost, who 
heads the University’s Office of Equal Opportunity 
and Affirmative Action, 402 Low Memorial Library, 
New York, NY 10027, telephone (212) 854-5511; or to 
the Director, Office for Civil Rights (Region II), 26 
Federal Plaza, New York, NY 10278. 

Columbia University admits students of any race, 
color, national and ethnic origin, and age to all the 
rights, privileges, programs and activities generally 
accorded or made available to students at the 
University. It does not discriminate against any person 
on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin, 
or age in administration of its educational policies, 
admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, 
athletic and other University-administered programs. 



OFFICIAL REGULATIONS 35 


Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as 
amended, prohibits discrimination against any person 
on the basis of race, color, or national origin in 
programs or activities receiving Federal financial 
assistance. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as 
amended, prohibits employment discrimination against 
any person because of race, color, religion, sex, or 
national origin. Executive Order 11246, as amended, 
prohibits discrimination in employment because of 
race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, and 
requires affirmative action to ensure equality of 
opportunity in all aspects of employment. In addition, 
the New York Human Rights Law, Article 15, 

Executive Law § 296 prohibits discrimination against 
any person in employment because of age, race, creed, 
color, national origin, disability, sex, marital status, and 
certain criminal offenses. 

Consistent with the requirements of Section 504 
of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and 
regulations thereunder, the University does not 
discriminate against any person on the basis of 
disability in admission or access to, employment or 
treatment in, its programs and activities. Section 503 
of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, requires 
affirmative action to employ and advance in 
employment qualified workers with disabilities. The 
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 also prohibits 
discrimination in public accommodation and in 
employment against a qualified person with a disability. 
It requires the University to provide qualified 
applicants and employees with reasonable 
accommodations that do not impose undue hardship 
or pose a direct threat of harm to themselves or 
others. 

The Equal Pay Act of 1963 prohibits discrimination 
on the basis of sex in rates of pay. The Age 
Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as 
amended, prohibits discrimination in employment on 
the basis of age. The Age Discrimination Act of 1975 
prohibits discrimination on the basis of age in 
programs and activities receiving Federal financial 
assistance. 


Section 313 of the New York Education Law, as 
amended, prohibits educational institutions from 
discriminating against persons seeking admission as 
students to any institution, program, or course 
because of race, religion, creed, sex, color, marital 
status, age, or national origin. The New York City 
Human Rights Law, Title 8, § 8-107, makes it an 
unlawful discriminatory practice for an employer to 
discriminate against any person because of their age, 
race, creed, color, national origin, gender, disability, 
marital status, sexual orientation, or alienage or 
citizenship status. It also prohibits educational institutions 
from discriminating against persons in any of the above 
categories in the provision of certain accommodations, 
advantages, facilities, or privileges. 

On December 1, 1978, the Columbia University 
Senate passed a resolution announcing its general 
educational policy on discrimination which reaffirms 
the University’s commitment to nondiscriminatory 
policies and practices. The Senate reaffirmed this 
policy on April 27, 1990, by expanding the categories 
protected from discrimination and adding protection 
against harassment as well. Currently, the policies 
protect against discrimination and harassment on the 
basis of race, color, gender, religion, national and 
ethnic origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual 
orientation and status as a Vietnam Era or disabled 
veteran. 

The Vietnam Era Veterans’ Re-adjustment Assistance 
Act of 1974, as amended, (38 U.S.C. 4212), prohibits job 
discrimination and requires affirmative action to employ 
and advance in employment qualified special disabled 
veterans and veterans of the Vietnam era. 

All employees, students, and applicants are protected 
from coercion, intimidation, interference, or retaliation 
for filing a complaint or assisting in an investigation under 
any of the foregoing policies and laws. 



36 OFFICIAL REGULATIONS 


The University’s Office of Equal Opportunity and 
Affirmative Action has also been designated to 
coordinate the University’s compliance activities under 
each of the programs referred to above. Any 
employee who believes that he or she has been denied 
equal opportunity should contact this Office, which 
will informally investigate complaints, offer advice and 
counsel on questions relating to equal opportunity and 
affirmative action, including information about 
applicable formal grievance procedures and agencies 
where complaints may be filed. 


DISCRIMINATION GRIEVANCE 
PROCEDURE 

The University’s Discrimination Grievance 
Procedure is available to enrolled students who feel 
that they have been victims of sexual harassment or 
discrimination on the basis of race, religion, national or 
ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, 
age, disability or Vietnam era and qualified special 
disabled veteran status. A copy of the Procedure is 
available in FACETS, the University student handbook 
and in the Office of the Associate Provost for Equal 
Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 402 Low 
Memorial Library or 101 Bard Hall (212-854-5511). 












A Complaint under this Procedure is initiated 
through completion of a Discrimination Complaint 
Form, also available in the Equal Opportunity and 
Affirmative Action Office. Staff in that Office will 
assist in completing the Form and are also available for 
confidential counseling and informal investigation of 
discrimination claims. 


THE FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATIONAL 
RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA) 

The University abides by the provisions of the 
Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 
1974. This act insures a wider range of rights, including 
but not limited to: information about student records 
that the University maintains, who maintains them, 
who has access to them, and for what purposes access 
is granted. The act also permits the University to 
release “directory information” without a student’s 
consent. In addition, the act guarantees student access 
to their records and restricts the access of others. 

Students who wish to restrict access to their 
directory information may do so at the Registrar’s 
Office, 205 Kent. This same office can provide a set of 
guidelines and a policy statement. The guidelines are 
also available on ColumbiaWeb and in the current 
edition of Facets. Questions about the interpretation 
of the guidelines should be referred to the University’s 
General Counsel, 412 Low Library. 



38 OFFICIAL REGULATIONS 


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY OMBUDS OFFICE 

The Ombuds Officer is a neutral complaint-handler 
serving all four campuses - Morningside, Health 
Sciences, Lamont, and Nevis - who seeks fair and 
equitable solutions to various problems that might 
arise. The Ombuds Office serves the entire Columbia 
University community. In considering any given 
instance or concern, the rights of all parties that may 
be involved, along with the welfare of the University, 
are taken into account. 

The Ombuds Office is a safe and confidential place 
to voice concerns. No formal permanent records of 
individual cases are kept except anonymous aggregate 
statistical data on the categories of complaints or 
inquiries it handles. The Ombuds Officer will not 
report the names of callers or visitor’s names or the 
specific content of problems reported, except under 
certain unusual conditions, and only after all 
reasonable steps have been taken to protect 
confidentiality. Such unusual circumstances include 
instances in which permission has been granted, those 
cases in which there is reasonable cause to believe that 
the caller’s or others’ safety may be endangered and 
those in which the office is required by law to release 
information. 

Except in such emergencies, the Ombuds Officer 
does not take action or investigate an issue without the 
permission of the person who introduced the 
information to the Ombuds Office. The Ombuds 
Officer will listen, offer information about Columbia 
University policies and procedures, present a range of 
options for resolving a problem or help find ways to 
convey information while maintaining its source’s 
confidentiality. In order to maintain neutrality, the 
Ombuds Officer does not participate in any formal 
grievances or other adversarial procedures. 

The Ombuds Officer is not an advocate for any 
individual party. 


The Ombuds Officer may conduct an informal, 
impartial investigation or facilitate a resolution upon 
request. The Ombuds Officer, however, does not 
arbitrate, adjudicate, or testify in any formal judicial or 
administrative hearing, unless compelled by legal 
process. The Ombuds Officer has no power to 
establish, change or circumvent any University rule or 
policy. Yet, the Ombuds Officer is a resource for 
administrators and when appropriate, may make 
recommendations or propose general changes in 
existing practices to correct problem areas or 
stimulate discussion of issues affecting the University 
community. 

The Ombuds Office supplements, but does not 
replace, the existing resources for conflict resolution 
and fair practice available at Columbia University. The 
Ombuds Office is independent of existing 
administrative structures and reports directly to the 
President of the University. 

For further information, contact Marsha Wagner, 
Ombuds Officer, 660 Schermerhorn Extension, 
telephone (212) 854-1234, fax, (212) 932-3712 e-mail 
ombuds@columbia.edu. 



39 


Protection Against Sexual Harassment 


POLICY STATEMENT ON SEXUAL 
HARASSMENT 

Federal Law (Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 
1964) provides that it shall be an unlawful 
discriminatory practice for any employer, because of 
the sex of any person, to discharge without just cause, 
to refuse to hire, or otherwise to discriminate against 
that person with respect to any matter directly or 
indirectly related to employment. Harassment of any 
employee on the basis of sex violates this federal law. 

To help clarify what is unlawful sexual harassment 
the Federal Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission (EEOC) has issued Guidelines on the 
subject. While the EEOC Guidelines apply only to 
faculty and other employees, the University prohibits 
sexual harassment of any member of the Columbia 
community, whether such harassment is aimed at 
students, faculty, or other employees, and violators will 
be subject to disciplinary action. Unwelcome sexual 
advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal 
or physical conduct of a sexual nature will constitute 
sexual harassment when: 

1. submission to such conduct is made explicitly or 
implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s 
employment; 

2. submission to or rejection of such conduct by an 
individual is used as the basis for academic or 
employment decisions affecting that individual; or, 

3. such conduct has the purpose or effect of 
unreasonably interfering with an individual’s 
academic or work performance, or creating an 
intimidating, hostile, or offensive academic or 
working environment. 


Any person who believes that he or she is being 
sexually harassed should seek a resolution of the 
problem through discussion with the person directly 
concerned. If this does not resolve the matter, or if 
there is a reluctance to deal directly with the person 
involved, the problem should then be brought to the 
attention of a member of the University Panel on 
Sexual Harassment. Advice may also be sought from 
the Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative 
Action, 402 Low Memorial Library; 212-854-5511 
or from the Ombuds Office, 212-854-1234. If these 
steps have not resolved the problem, the applicable 
University grievance procedure should be used 
including the University Discrimination Grievance 
Procedure that is available if no other University 
grievance procedure is specifically applicable. No one 
at the University may retaliate in any way against a 
person who makes a claim of sexual harassment. 



40 PROTECTION AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT 


CHARGE OF THE UNIVERSITY PANEL ON 
SEXUAL HARASSMENT 

The Columbia Panel on Sexual Harassment is 
composed of trusted, accessible, and sympathetic 
members of the University community who act as 
informal mediators. Their goal is the protection and 
counsel of any member of the University who is made 
to feel personally pressured or uncomfortable because 
of the behavior of another University member. 
Members of the Panel provide a safe, impartial, non- 
adversarial setting in which the problem can be 
considered or solved through confidential counseling 
and, when requested, mediation between the 
complainant and the alleged harasser. The Panel thus 
provides guidance and protection for the accused as 
well identifying false or mistaken accusations, 
misunderstandings or unconscious behavior. Panel 
members are also a link through which the University 
can take account of, and take appropriate action 
against, those on campus who are behaving illegally. 
The Panel on Sexual Harassment is a timely, 
protective, and compassionate arm of the University, 
one that not only sensitizes and educates the 
University community but also demonstrates the 
University’s commitment to fair treatment of all its 
members. 


disciplinary procedure applies to these same groups 
(through April 2000, unless extended), with the 
exception of the Law School. The policy prohibits 
sexual assault of one student against another student. 
A comprehensive program to address the issue has 
also been developed. Copies of the policy and 
alternative procedure are also available through 
Columbia’s Office of Equal Opportunity and 
Affirmative Action, 402 Low Memorial Library or 101 
Bard Hall; mailing address: Mail Code 4333, 535 West 
116th Street, New York, NY 10027; telephone: (212) 
854-5511; fax: (212) 854-1368. A brief summary 
description of the policy, procedure, and program 
follows. 

Policy 

Columbia University’s Policy defines sexual 
misconduct as nonconsensual, intentional physical 
contact with a person’s genitals, buttocks, and/or 
breasts. Lack of consent may be inferred from the use 
of force, coercion, physical intimidation, or advantage 
gained by the victim’s mental and/or physical 
impairment or incapacity, of which the perpetrator 
was, or should have been, aware. 


Panel Membership List 

Names and contact information for members of 
the Columbia Panel on Sexual Harassment can be 
found in Appendix E of FACETS, the University student 
handbook. 


Sexual Misconduct Policy and Alternative 
Procedure 

On April 27, 1995, the University Senate adopted a 
Sexual Misconduct Policy and grievance procedure that 
can be used as an alternative to traditional Dean’s 
Discipline. The Sexual Misconduct Policy applies to 
students in all schools on the Morningside campus, all 
schools on the Health Sciences campus, Barnard 
College, and Teachers College. The alternative 



PROTECTION AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT 41 


Alternative Procedure 

The alternative procedure may be chosen in lieu of 
traditional Dean’s Discipline, Columbia’s sexual 
harassment procedure, or informal internal means of 
mediated resolution, by a student who alleges he or 
she has been the victim of sexual assault in violation of 
the University’s policy. It can be initiated by contacting 
a Gatekeeper or the Associate Provost for Equal 
Opportunity and Affirmative Action and filing a 
complaint. If the established criteria are met and the 
situation is not otherwise resolved, a hearing may be 
convened before a three-member panel consisting of 
one student, one faculty member, and one 
administrator. The complainant and the accused will 
be asked to provide information to the panel and, 
along with other information made available, it will be 
used to make a determination of guilt or innocence 
and any disciplinary action deemed warranted. The 
determination is sent as a recommendation to the 
Dean of Students of the accused’s school, whose 
decision is final. There are appeal avenues at various 
stages of the procedure available to the complainant 
and the accused. 

Hearing Panelists 

Hearing Panelists are selected by the Associate 
Provost from a pool of students, faculty members, and 
officers of administration. None of the panelists will 
be from the school/department of the complainant or 
accused or closely affiliated with either party. 


For a list of current Gatekeepers or for additional 
information, please contact the Office of Equal 
Opportunity and Affirmative Action, (212) 854-5511. 

Romantic Relationship Advisory Statement 

Faculty and staff members are cautioned that 
consensual romantic relationships with student 
members of the University community, while not 
expressly prohibited, can be problematic. A faculty or 
staff member involved in such a relationship with a 
student is expected to remove him/herself from 
academic or professional decisions concerning the 
student. The Provost has, however, authorized some 
departments to adopt more restrictive policies. 
Individuals with questions about the position of their 
department are encouraged to raise them with their 
department head. 

Should a romantic relationship with a student lead 
to a charge of sexual harassment against a faculty or 
staff member, the University will pursue it in 
accordance with its Sexual Harassment Policy and 
applicable grievance procedure. Questions about this 
Advisory Statement may be directed to Associate 
Provost Beth Wilson, Office of Equal Opportunity and 
Affirmative Action, 402 Low Memorial Library or 101 
Bard Hall, (212) 854-5511. For the complete 
statement, please see Appendix F of FACETS, the 
University student handbook. 


Gatekeepers 

Twelve Associate or Assistant Deans have been 
appointed and trained to provide information about 
the policy and alternative procedure as well as other 
options for dealing with a sexual assault. They can also 
receive complaints for mediation, investigation, and 
formal or informal resolution. Any one of the 
Gatekeepers may be contacted for information or 
advice or to report an incident of sexual misconduct. 
Gatekeepers cannot accept complaints by or against 
students of their own schools. 



42 


Academic Affairs 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The Entry-To-Practice Master’s (ETP) Program 

The Entry-To-Practice (ETP) program 
is an accelerated combined-degree (B.S./M.S.) 
program for non-nurse college graduates. 

The Entry-To-Practice program is designed to 
prepare the student for a career as an Advanced 
Practice Nurse. Academic studies are closely 
integrated with clinical experience. Graduate-level 
courses are incorporated into basic education, 
facilitating the transition to master’s level study in a 
selected specialty. 

There are two components: the first phase 
prepares the student for generic nursing practice and 
the second (Master’s Degree) focuses on an advanced 
practice role in professional nursing. This latter role is 
the primary goal of our program. 

PHASE I: PRE-LICENSURE 

The program of study in the first phase continues 
instruction in the biological and behavioral sciences, 
and incorporates the clinical and didactic learning 
necessary for the first professional degree. The 
Bachelor of Science phase can be completed in twelve 
months of full-time study. At the end of this phase, 
students are eligible to take the professional nurse 
licensure examination. 

Clinical education receives major emphasis, with 
patient experiences beginning early in the first term. 
Theory and precepted clinical practice are related to 
the promotion of health and prevention of illness, as 
well as to the care of the sick and their restoration to 
optimal health. Students work with patients in a 
variety of settings, such as clinics, hospitals, community 
centers, and the home. 

The curriculum is built on the integrated health 
model, beginning with wellness and progressing 
through illness to maintenance and rehabilitation. The 
initial focus is on health, with emphasis on promotion 
of health and prevention of illness. 


Students begin the program in May (Summer) 
term. Phase I is completed in four semesters’ 
including a winter semester, at the end of the Spring 
semester (May). This course sequencing has been 
designed to allow for: 

a. Early transition into full-time graduate study. 

b. Facilitation of career transition during a quieter 
time in the University. 

c. A decrease in costs to students vis-a-vis living 
expenses, etc. 

d. Earlier access to graduate level scholarships and 
loans. 

OBJECTIVES 

At the end of the first phase of the accelerated Entry- 
To-Practice program, the student is awarded a Bachelor of 
Science degree with a major in nursing and is able to: 

• Integrate knowledge from the biological, 
physical, and behavioral sciences in caring for 
individuals, families, and groups on the health- 
illness continuum in a variety of settings. 

• Demonstrate competence in the application of 
nursing interventions directed toward the 
promotion, maintenance, and restoration of 
health, while maximizing client participation in 
the decision-making process. 

• Apply the nursing process to the delivery of 
nursing care. 

• Analyze the health care beliefs and practices of 
the major sociocultural groups in American 
society today for the purpose of individualizing 
nursing approaches. 

• Apply principles of leadership and management 
to the delivery of nursing care. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 43 


• Analyze the influence of current and projected 
demographic, social, environmental, and 
political/legislative trends upon the health care 
needs of individuals and communities. 

• Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for 
individual nursing practice. 

• Collaborate with other health care professionals 
to promote the delivery of comprehensive 
health care. 

• Analyze research in terms of its clinical 
applicability to nursing practice. 

• Apply ethical-moral reasoning in clinical decision 
making. 

• Synthesize a personal philosophy of nursing care 
and practice framework. 

• Serve as an advocate for the consumer and the 
profession of nursing within the health care 
delivery system and the socio-political-legal 
arena. 

PHASE II: POST-LICENSURE 

The student enters Phase II of the accelerated 
Entry-To-Practice program with 8 credits of graduate 
study already completed. The student may select one of 
the School of Nursing’s graduate majors for study (see 
The Master’s Program, below). Admission to the 
Master’s program is guaranteed to students who 
successfully complete Phase I, and every effort is made 
for admission to the clinical specialty of choice. 


The Accelerated Master’s Program for Nurses 
(AMP) 

OVERVIEW 

The Accelerated Master’s Program (AMP) 
recognizes the clinical knowledge and experience of 
practicing registered nurses (RNs) and provides an 
academic and theoretical base for their practice. 
Graduate courses begin in the first term, and the 
highly focused nature of the program fosters 
motivation and commitment. 

AMP is designed to further the educational and 
career goals of RNs who already hold an associate’s 
degree in nursing. The Columbia University School of 
Nursing grants both a B.S. degree in nursing and an M.S. 
degree in a clinical specialty. With full-time study, the 
combined program can be completed in five 
semesters. Part-time study is also available. 

RNs with an ADN and a non-nursing 
baccalaureate may also apply- sixteen credits of upper- 
division nursing courses are taken before progressing 
to the MS major. 

For qualified RNs, AMP offers the following 
benefits: admission to the graduate program (no 
guarantees can be made for a particular clinical 
specialty however); graduate-level study as early as the 
first term; and advanced standing in the graduate 
phase of the program. 

The School of Nursing looks toward AMP to 
further enrich the collaboration between education 
and practice in order to help meet the growing needs 
for baccalaureate and master’s-prepared clinicians, and 
to enable nurses to further their education and careers 
in an atmosphere of excellence. 



44 PROGRAMS OF STUDY 


BS PHASE 

The BS phase for RNs with an associate degree 
only requires the completion of 60 credits. Forty-two 
(42) credits of upper division nursing courses, 
including eight credits of master’s level coursework, 
are taken at the School of Nursing. Fifteen (15) liberal 
arts credits and a three credits statistics course are 
taken at another school and transferred into the 
School. The transfer policy is detailed elsewhere in 
this Bulletin. 

For RNs with an associate degree and a non¬ 
nursing BS, sixteen (16) credits of upper division 
nursing courses are taken at the School of Nursing. A 
BS degree is not awarded and master’s level courses 
may be taken concurrently, schedule permitting. 

M.S. PHASE 

AMP students enter the master’s phase at the 
same time as other CUSN M.S. students. AMP 
students have already completed some graduate work 
and are therefore exempt from 8 credits. A minimum 


of 36 credits in residence at the School of Nursing and 
all specialty program requirements must be completed 
in this phase. In the M.S. phase, all AMP students are 
assigned a faculty adviser in their area of clinical 
interest, who will guide them in planning a specific 
program of graduate study in one of the clinical majors 
(see The Master’s Program, below). 

The Master’s Program 
OVERVIEW 

The purpose of the Master of Science degree 
program is to prepare nurses in Advanced Clinical 
Practice. The clinical specialties are in relation to client 
group, which in turn is defined by age and by health- 
illness status. All programs are accredited by the NYS 
Education Department as nurse practitioner programs, 
allowing successful graduates to be certified in New 
York State for advanced clinical nursing practice. 


















PROGRAMS OF STUDY 45 


Clinical majors currently available 
are as follows: 

Adult Nurse Practitioner 

Nurse Anesthesia 

Acute Care Nurse Practitioner 

Family Nurse Practitioner 

Geriatric Nurse Practitioner 

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner 

Nurse Midwifery 

Neonatal Nurse Practitioner 

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner 

Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner 

Other specialty majors may be added from time to 
time. Admission to a specialty for matriculation 
requires a minimum cohort, usually ten (10). 

OBJECTIVES OF THE MASTER’S PROGRAM 

The program prepares students to: 

• Evaluate the health status of individuals, families, 
or groups. 

• Assume accountability for therapeutic 
intervention with individuals, families, or groups 
within clinical settings. 

• Institute and maintain interdependent 
professional relationships throughout the health 
care delivery system. 

• Initiate, participate in, and utilize research and its 
findings. 

• Analyze historical and current issues in order to 
influence the development of professional 
nursing and the health care delivery system. 

• Utilize strategies that can affect the delivery of 
services. 

• Formulate professional goals and plans for 
implementation. 

The curriculum for the Master of Science degree 
has four components: 

Core and Supporting Sciences 20 to 25 credits 
Clinical major courses 20 to 31 credits 

Electives 0 to 9 credits 


MASTER’S CURRICULUM OVERVIEW 

Core Courses (8-11 credits) provide the basis for 
the analysis and application of a variety of theories to 
an Advanced Practice role, and the opportunity to 
discuss broad professional issues across specialties. 

Science Courses (9-17 credits) provide the basis for 
an understanding of normal and abnormal bodily 
functioning and enable the student to form a 
comprehensive plan of care in the promotion of health 
and prevention of illness. 

Specialty Courses (minimum of 22 credits) focus on 
the clinical application and integration of theory to 
Advanced Practice situations. Didactic and clinical courses 
are specific to the clinical specialty chosen for study. In 
clinical experience courses, students function in the role 
of nurse practitioner. A project is required. 

Electives (0-9 credits), selected on the basis of 
professional interest and goals, deepen the 
understanding of the Advanced Practice role. 

Courses in the clinical major focus on clinical 
application and integration of theory through guided 
practice. Because majors may partially overlap in 
relation to either client health status or client age group, 
given courses required in more than one major may be 
elected by students from another major in order to 
respond to students’ special interests. Flexibility is also 
enhanced through individualized study courses offered 
in the final term of most majors. 

Some majors allow for a small number of electives, 
which can be taken either within the School or in 
other parts of the University. Curricula for specific 
programs are available in the Office of Student 
Services. 

A Master’s Completion program is also offered for 
certified NPs, CNMs, and CRNAs. 

All Master’s students complete either a 
comprehensive examination or a specially focused 
project as part of their degree requirements. 




46 PROGRAMS OF STUDY 


Advanced Practice Programs 

ACUTE CARE NURSE PRACTITIONER 

This program is designed to prepare nurses to care 
for patients who are acutely and critically ill across the 
continuum of acute care services. Students gain a 
strong background in advanced assessment (including 
children) and therapeutics, technology and skills. An 
additional sub-specialty is available in Emergency Care. 

Clinical experiences are provided in leading 
medical centers in the tri-state area. Emphasis is 
placed on integrating didactic knowledge with patient 
management and advanced technical skills. Graduates 
are eligible to take the national professional certifying 
exam offered by the ANCC (American Nurse 
Credentialing Center). The program is certified for 
advanced practice/nurse practitioner status by the 
New York State Education Department. 

NURSE ANESTHESIA 

This graduate program is a 24-month full-time or 
36-month part-time program which includes a 
compulsory anesthesia residency. The first year 
curriculum is largely devoted to advanced science 
courses and graduate core courses. The Clinical 
component is begun during the Summer session of the 
first year. 

The program is designed to provide the student 
with continuous opportunities to relate theoretical 
knowledge with clinical practice by assuming increasing 
responsibility for total anesthesia patient care under 
tutorial guidance. The application of theoretical 
knowledge to the realities of clinical practice is a 
dynamic process which enhances and enriches learning 
as well as prepares the graduate to function effectively 
and competently as a professional. The sequential 
design of the program permits the student to acquire 
the skills necessary to move along this continuum. 
Mastery of learning is a pre-requisite for progress 
during this phase. 

The program is fully accredited by the Council on 
Accreditation for Nurse Anesthesia Educational 
Programs. Clinical experiences are provided at leading 
medical facilities throughout the tri-state and New 
England area. 


NURSE MIDWIFERY 

The Nurse Midwifery program is designed to 
prepare nurses with labor and delivery experience to 
be nurse midwives. The focus of the academic and 
clinical aspects of this program is the management of 
the health care of low-risk women and their newborns. 
Although emphasis is placed on care during the 
childbearing cycle, the curriculum also includes study 
of women’s primary health care needs throughout the 
life cycle. The graduate is thus prepared for the full 
scope of midwifery practice, including well-woman 
gynecology and primary health care, family planning, 
antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and normal 
newborn care. Intensive clinical experience is provided 
in each of these areas in a variety of settings, exposing 
students to diversity in patient populations and in 
practice options. Students learn to provide 
independent care for healthy women and consultative 
or collaborative care for the woman with medical 
and/or obstetrical complications. 

All students graduating from the Nurse Midwifery 
program are eligible to take the national certifying 
examination administered by the American College of 
Nurse-Midwives’ Certification Council. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 47 


PSYCHIATRIC/MENTAL HEALTH NURSE 
PRACTITIONER 

The master’s program in Psychiatric Mental Health 
Nursing at Columbia University provides qualified 
students the opportunity to acquire an in-depth 
theoretical understanding of advanced nursing practice. 
The program was established in 1965, and today 
graduates of the program are practicing in extremely 
varied and diverse settings such as community mental 
health centers, day treatment programs, substance 
abuse programs, shelters for women and children, 
liaison settings and private practice. 

Subspecialization is encouraged and includes work 
with children, adolescents, adults or the elderly, 
families, alcohol or substance abusing clients, genetic 
counseling and consultation/liaison settings and private 
practice. Theory and supervised clinical experience 
form the foundation for work as a primary therapist 
for individuals, groups and families. The program 
draws on the psychodynamic, developmental, 
biological and family systems models. Attention is 
given to issues of ethnicity, gender, and family values. 

The faculty is extremely proud of the program’s 
strong clinical component. Students are provided with 
an in-depth opportunity to integrate theory and 
therapy techniques. Graduates are eligible to take the 
certifying exam offered by the American Nurses 
Association and are eligible for licensure in New York 
state as Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners. 

ADULT NURSE PRACTITIONER 

This program is designed to prepare nurses to 
deliver primary care to adult clients. The core 
curriculum provides students with an in-depth 
understanding of advanced nursing practice and 
enables them to apply this understanding to a clinical 
concentration. Students choose one of several 
concentrations. The clinical concentration provides 
students with the further educational preparation 
necessary to pursue leadership positions in clinical 
practice, research, education and management. 


Graduates are eligible for certification as a nurse 
practitioner in all states that require it. Graduates are 
also eligible to take the certification examination 
offered by the American Nurses’ Association and the 
American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. 

FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER 

The Family Nurse Practitioner major is a graduate 
program designed to prepare nurses to deliver 
primary health care to families in a variety of settings. 

Students follow family members through the life 
cycle utilizing obstetric, pediatric, gynecologic, as well 
as adult and geriatric primary care diagnostic and 
management skills. 

Graduates are eligible to take the certifying 
examination offered by the American Nurses’ 
Association and the American Academy of Nurse 
Practitioners. Graduates assume posititons in a variety 
of settings such as outpatient clinics, community health 
centers, private practice offices, health departments, 
homeless shelters, chronic care facilities, day care 
programs, hospices, homes, and acute care settings. 

The scope of practice of the family nurse 
practitioner is based on a team approach. An 
interdependent member of the health team, the family 
nurse practitioner provides primary care through the 
following means: 

1. Documentation of individual and family health 
history. 

2. Physical assessment. 

3. Diagnostic, therapeutic and educational care plans. 

4. Collaboration with physicians and other health 
care professionals. 

5. Referral to appropriate health care providers. 

6. Coordination of health care maintenance. 



48 PROGRAMS OF STUDY 


GERIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER 

The Geriatric Nurse Practitioner (GNP) program 
is designed to prepare nurse practitioners in primary 
health care of the elderly and their families. The 
program is sensitive and responsive to the complex 
and diverse health and psychosocial needs of a growing 
population of elderly in acute, ambulatory, chronic, 
and community care settings. 

The program focuses on comprehensive 
assessment, illness prevention, health maintenance, 
management of complex acute and chronic health 
conditions, client and family education, consultation, 
and referral. The interdisciplinary nature of geriatric 
care is reflected in the large variety of clinical 
experiences. 

Successful completion of the Geriatric Nurse 
Practitioner program qualifies the student to apply for 
certification as a geriatric nurse practitioner in New 
York State. The graduate is also eligible to take the 
certification examinations offered by the American 
Nurses Association and the American Academy of 
Nurse Practitioners. 

NEONATAL NURSE PRACTITIONER 

The Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (NNP) graduate 
program is designed to prepare experienced nurses 
who seek advanced knowledge and skill to practice as 
neonatal nurse practitioners in health care 
management of clients in the neonatal period, infancy, 
and early childhood in a variety of care settings, such 
as acute care facilities, chronic care facilities, outpatient 
facilities, and homes. Theory and clinical experiences 
focus first on the well neonate and then progress to 
episodic and chronic illness. The nurse who is 
prepared at this master’s degree level exercises 
sophisticated clinical judgment based on advanced 
theoretical and scientific knowledge, serves as a model 
in collaborative practice with other health care 
professionals, and leads in the advancement of 
contemporary professional nursing by contributing to 
practice, research, and theory building. 

Successful completion of the NNP program 
qualifies the graduate to apply for certification as a 
neonatal nurse practitioner in New York State. The 


graduate is also eligible to take the certifying 
examination offered by the National Certification 
Corporation for the Obstetric, Gynecologic and 
Neonatal Nursing Specialties (NCC). 

PEDIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER 

The Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) program is 
designed to prepare experienced nurses who seek 
advanced knowledge and skill to practice as pediatric 
nurse practitioners in the delivery of primary health 
care to infants, children, and adolescents. Graduates 
work in a variety of settings such as community health 
centers, day care programs, chronic care facilities, 
outpatient facilities, private practice offices, schools, 
health departments, homes, and tertiary care facilities. 
The nurse who is prepared at this master’s degree 
level exercises sophisticated clinical judgment based on 
advanced theoretical and scientific knowledge, serves 
as a model in collaborative practice with other health 
care professionals, and leads in the advancement of 
contemporary professional nursing by contributing to 
practice, research, and theory building. 

Successful completion of the Pediatric Nurse 
Practitioner program qualifies the student to apply for 
certification as a pediatric nurse practitioner in New 
York State. The graduate is also eligible to take the 
certifying examination offered by the National 
Certification Board of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners 
and Nurses and/or by the American Nurses 
Association. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 49 


WOMEN’S HEALTH NURSE PRACTITIONER 

Columbia University’s graduate program for 
Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner (WHNP) focuses 
on the development of an advanced practice nurse who 
provides primary care to women across the life-span, 
from adolescence to very elderly. 

The WHNP program encourages the students to 
consider the uniqueness of the individual woman and 
the woman in the context of (1) her community, (2) 
her relationships with others, (3) her environment. 

Such woman-centered care is appropriate across 
populations, social classes, socioeconomic and age 
groups and in urban, suburban and rural settings. 

Successful completion of the program qualifies the 
students to apply for certification as Nurse 
Practitioners in New York State and to take the 
Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner certifying exam 
offered by the National Certification Corporation 
(NCC) for the Obstetric, Gynecological, and Neonatal 
Nursing Specialties. 

The Advanced Certificate Programs 

These programs are designed to prepare nurses with 
a master’s degree as Advanced Practice Nurses, (Nurse 
Practitioners). Theory and clinical experiences focus first 
on the well population and then progress to episodic and 
chronic illness. Clinical experiences are consistent with the 
student’s long-term career goals. Graduates assume 
positions in a variety of settings in both urban and rural 
areas. Graduates are eligible for certification as nurse 
practitioners in New York State. Graduates are also 
eligible to take the certification examination offered by 
the American Nurses’ Association, as well as other 
specialty associations. The curriculum consists of 
supportive science courses and clinical specialty 
courses. Advanced certificates are available in all the 
specialty majors: ANP, GNP, FNP, PNP, WHNP, NNP, 
ACNP, P/MHNP, CNM. Curricula for specific 
programs are available in the Office of Student 
Services. 

SUBSPECIALTY PROGRAMS 

HIV/AIDS Subspecialty Program 

This program is designed to prepare nurses to 
provide advanced and specialized care to persons with 


HIV infection as clinicians, clinical nurse specialists, and 
patient care educators. Students will have an 
opportunity to participate with many of the New York 
State Designated AIDS Centers, and with the School’s 
Center for AIDS Research. 

Genetic Counseling 

This seven-credit subspecialty is designed for 
nurses in a master of science program in nursing who 
wish to develop expertise in working with families at 
risk for or with genetic disorders. Advances of the 
human genome project as well as ethical, social, 
emotional, and legal issues are considered. 

Alcohol and Substance Abuse 

This nine-credit subspecialty is designed to prepare 
nurses to provide advanced and specialized care to 
persons with chemical dependency as Nurse 
Practitioners and Clinical Specialists. Coursework will 
provide a foundation for the understanding of 
substance abuse utilizing a variety of theories of 
causation. Students will develop skills working with 
chemically-dependent patients and families in their 
advanced practice settings. 

Emergency Nursing 

This seven-credit subspecialty is designed to 
augment acute or critical care practitioners’ knowledge 
base with didactic and clinical experience in emergency 
care of all age groups. This subspecialty is open to any 
advanced nursing practice major. 

Nephrology Nursing 

This eight-credit subspecialty focuses on the 
knowledge base necessary to care for patients with 
advanced or chronic renal disease. Two didactic 
courses explore advanced renal physiology and 
diagnosis and management of acute chronic renal 
failure and end stage renal disease. Didactic content is 
illuminated by guided clinical experience. 

Acute/Critical Care for PNP’s 

An eight-credit cluster for pediatric nurse 
practitioners who wish to provide care to infants, 
children and adolescents in a variety of acute care 
settings such as PICUs, emergency departments and 
pediatric transport services, this subspecialty is 
completed in one semester. 



50 PROGRAMS OF STUDY 


Behavioral Pediatrics 

This seven-credit subspecialty explores the issues 
and concepts of behavioral pediatrics encountered in a 
primary care community setting. Comprised of a 
didactic course, a seminar and a clinical practicum, 
content focuses on the developmental^ appropriate 
behaviors, variations, problems and disorders as well 
as the impact of environment, stressors, risk and 
protective factors. 

Clinical Research Coordination 

This six-credit subspecialty develops the knowledge 
necessary to supervise the running of clinical research 
trials. Two didactic courses explore the practical 
aspects, research design and measurement and their 
implementation. A clinical practicum provides 
opportunity for supervised experience. 

Gero Psychiatry 

This variable credit, individualized subspecialty 
study melds gerontologic and psychiatric/mental 
health advanced practice nursing in seminar and clinical 
experiences. 

Doctor of Nursing Science (DNSc) Degree 
Program 

The Doctor of Nursing Science (DNSc) degree 
program is designed to prepare clinical nurse scholars 
to examine, shape, and direct the practice of nursing 
within our evolving system of health care delivery. The 
doctoral program enhances the foundation of nursing 
science cultivated at the master’s level. Core courses 
help the student develop skills in research 
methodology, which are necessary to ensure the 
insightful examination of clinical nursing practice, and 
provide knowledge of health policy that prepares 
graduates to play major roles in reshaping nursing and 
health care. Students choose either clinical nursing 
research or health policy tracks, developing depth in 
the specialty area through an individualized program of 
study. Specifically, graduates will be prepared to: 

• Direct improvements in nursing care within the 
health care delivery system 


• Test and/or generate concepts, theories, and 
models for clinical nursing practice 

• Function as clinical nurse scientists 

• Design, conduct, direct, and report research 
studies; 

• Evaluate and develop standards for the 
advancement of nursing science; 

• Collaborate with other professionals to influence 
the delivery of health care. 

The curriculum consists of a core of required 
courses in the theoretical foundations of nursing 
science and the analytical foundations of nursing 
science; a specialty component in either health policy 
or clinical nursing leadership and research; and the 
dissertation. In addition, students must successfully 
complete a comprehensive examination and write and 
successfully defend a dissertation. The doctoral 
program must be completed within seven (7) years of 
matriculation. 

Joint-Degree Programs 

NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH 

(M.S./M.P.H.) 

The objective of this joint-degree program, which 
offers a Master of Science from the School of Nursing 
and a Master of Public Health from the School of 
Public Health, is to prepare nurses to be both 
advanced clinical practitioners and public health 
practitioners or administrators in a variety of 
community settings, including hospitals. The program 
is particularly valuable to nurses whose career goals 
are focused on the field of nursing but who also desire 
a broader interdisciplinary outlook. 

Joint application is simplified. References and 
transcripts are shared, so duplication is not usually 
necessary. However, students must complete 
application forms for both schools. Although the 
School of Nursing accepts either the GRE or MAT, the 
School of Public Health will only accept the GRE. 

The student may apply and be accepted in both 
programs at the same time but start in either school, 
with an adviser in each school assigned immediately to 
coordinate the student’s program and to approve each 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 51 


term’s class choices. Total credit requirements are a 
minimum of 75 credits (depending on the nursing and 
public health specializations) plus the School of Public 
Health’s one-term practicum. At least 30 credits must 
be earned in residence in each school in order for a 
degree to be granted. Each student’s curriculum is 
planned individually to meet his or her goals, but the 
basic requirements for admission and graduation for 
each school must be met. In the School of Nursing, 
the minimum number of required credits for core and 
major (or track) courses ranges from approximately 
30 to 52 credits, depending on the clinical track 
selected. The completion of the Nursing M.S. degree 
allows students to register with New York State as 
nurse practitioners. In the School of Public Health, the 
minimum is approximately 30 to 45 credits, depending 
on the concentration. In both schools, students must 
also be accepted in a specific track/division. Financial 
aid is available in both schools for eligible students. 
Students may not, however, receive financial aid from 
both schools during the same academic year. 

Students in the School of Public Health must 
complete the core courses in biostatistics, 
epidemiology, sociomedical sciences, environmental 
health sciences, and health policy and management. 
Joint-degree students may choose any School of Public 
Health major for combination with any School of 
Nursing clinical specialty major. 


NURSING AND BUSINESS (M.S./M.B.A.) 

The School of Nursing, in collaboration with the 
Columbia University School of Business, offers a 
combined 75-credit M.S./M.B.A. degree. This 
program allows full or part-time study. 

This graduate program is designed for students 
with an interest in management and nursing who 
intend to be both advanced clinical practitioners and 
professionally educated managers in a health care 
setting. 

Students must apply separately to, and be 
admitted by, both schools for the autumn term. In 
addition to satisfying the M.B.A. requirements, 
students must complete fifteen business courses and 
be registered for 45 credits at the Business School. At 
the School of Nursing, students must register for and 
complete a minimum of 30 credits, depending on the 
area of clinical specialty. Overall, a minimum of 75 
credits is required for completion of the joint degree. 
Students select a clinical specialty at the School of 
Nursing but need not choose a specific concentration 
at the Business School. Students are guided in the 
selection of courses to meet career goals and 
individual interests. 

Applicants apply separately to the School of 
Nursing and the School of Business and must meet the 
admission criteria for both schools. The School of 
Business admission requirements include: 

1. A baccalaureate degree (in nursing). 

2. A calculus course. A four-day refresher course, as 
well as a six-day course for those with a limited 
calculus background who feel that they need an 
extensive concentrated course, are offered at the 
Business School in August. 

3. Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT) 
scores. Applicants to the M.S./M.B.A. program 
should not take the GRE. A GMAT score of at 
least 550-700 is necessary for admission. Students 
considering admission for the autumn term should 
take the GMAT no later than the preceding 
January. 

4. Computer proficiency. 



52 


Courses of Instruction 


Key to Course Listings 

In the listings of courses of instruction for all 
programs, each course number consists of a capital 
letter followed by four digits. 

The capital letter indicates the University faculty or 
division offering the course, for example: 

M Faculty of Nursing 

The first digit indicates the level of the course, as 
follows: 

4 First professional degree courses 

5 Intermediate Courses (Do not count for master’s 
degree) 

6 Graduate Core and Shared Sciences courses 

8 Advanced level graduate courses, clinical practice, 
case seminars, open only to matriculated master’s 
degree candidates 

9 Doctoral courses 

Two consecutive numbers that are joined with a 
hyphen indicate a course that runs through both 
terms. The first half is prerequisite to the second half 
unless the course description says otherwise. 

Course Credit 

The number of credits that a course carries each 
term is given in italics in the left margin of the course 
description. 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

The University reserves the right to withdraw 
or modify courses of instruction or to change 
instructors or class times as may be necessary. 
Course descriptions are in numerical order. 

All clinical specialty and doctoral courses 
require permission of the instructor for 
registration. 

Nursing M4000 
Clinical Practice I 

2 credits. Clinical Practice I is a clinical and lecture course 
designed to introduce emerging health care professionals (from 
the dental, medical and advanced practice nursing programs) to 
the knowledge, skills, and perspectives essential to providing 
comprehensive care to clients, families and communities. Care of 
human beings requires scientific and technical expertise, as well 
as an understanding of each person’s unique qualities and 
circumstances, for these are the contexts in which knowledge 
must be translated into health promotion and disease prevention. 
This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M400I 
Clinical Practice II 

2 Credits. Prerequisite: A/14000. Continuation of Clinical Practice I 
in exploring the complex task of providing comprehensive 
individualized health care. Each of the participating disciplines in 
this course adjusts it to its own needs, adding or modifying 
content as required. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M4030 

Introduction to Alcohol and Substance Abuse: 
Theories of Causation 

3-4 credits. Prerequisite and Corequisite: M8560. This course will 
provide a foundation for the understanding of substance abuse 
utilizing a variety of theories of causation. Evaluation and assessment 
skills will be taught. Theoretical models upon which to base clinical 
practice will be discussed. The course has a clinical component 
where the student will analyze one theory of causation, the 
multigenerational process. By constructing a genogram in the 
context of a family meeting, the student will have an opportunity to 
see the influence of the multigenerational process and the role that 
the family plays in maintaining the addiction. Physiological, 
behavioral, emotional and societal responses to alcohol and 
substance abuse are investigated. Implications for nursing research 
are considered. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 53 


Nursing M4032 

Contemporary Issues and Trends in Alcohol 
and Substance Abuse 

3 credits. Prerequisite: A/14030. This seminar will provide a 
forum for students to explore issues of prevention in alcohol and 
substance abuse. Protective factors, social costs, stigma, 
legalization of drugs and pain management are among the issues 
which will be discussed and the role that institutions play in 
identifying and referring. The role of the advanced practice 
nurse in primary prevention will be explored. Students will be 
expected to develop a primary prevention program. 

Nursing M4034 

Clinical Management of the Patient with 
Chemical Dependency: Intervention and 
Evaluation. 

3 credits. Prerequisite: N\4030 and M4032. This clinical practice 
course is designed for students to develop skills in working with 
chemically dependent patients and families. It consists of clinical 
practice and supervision totaling 12 hours per week. Students 
will work with chemically dependent clients and families in their 
advanced practice settings. The course is for students in both 
clinical specialist and nurse practitioner settings. 

Nursing M4050 
Physical Assessment 

3 credits. This course is designed to introduce the knowledge and 
skills required to perform a systematic examination of a healthy 
adult, and to record findings appropriately. Since skills are easily 
lost without continued practice and validation of observations, 
class lecture/discussions, supervised laboratory, and individual 
use of readings and audiovisual materials will be required for 
successful learning. 

Nursing M405I 

Physical Assessment Laboratory 

2 Credits. Corequisite: M4050. Guided laboratory study for 
development of skills necessary to perform systematic physical 
examination. 

Nursing M4I00 
Pharmacology 

3 credits. The course is a basic one, requiring no prerequisites 
except a basic working knowledge of the elementary sciences 
(biology, chemistry, anatomy and physiology). Basic physiology 
and pathophysiology will be discussed and then the various drugs 
that are involved in the modification or therapeutics of those 
systems will be explained. 


Nursing M4I08 
Anatomy and Physiology 

4 credits. This course presents the structure (anatomy) and 
function (physiology) of the human body. It will survey the body 
on several levels - from organism and system to cell and 
molecule. A sound understanding of the body - its anatomy and 
physiology - are essential for more advanced knowledge of health 
and disease. Extensive computer resources are used. 

Nursing M4II4 

Issues in Professional Nursing (ETPs) 

2 credits. This course is designed for the baccalaureate student, 
in a combined degree program in nursing, to develop an 
understanding of issues confronting the professional nurse. The 
emphasis is on history, trends, issues of the profession and their 
interrelatedness with sociocultural forces affecting the quality, 
nature and delivery of health care. 

Nursing M4I20 

Issues in Professional Nursing (ETPs) 

3 credits. This course is designed for the baccalaureate student, 
in a combined degree program in nursing, to develop an 
understanding of issues confronting the professional nurse. The 
emphasis is on history, trends, issues of the profession and their 
interrelatedness with sociocultural forces affecting the quality, 
nature and delivery of health care. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M4I25 

Advanced Issues in Professional Nursing for 

RNs (AMP) 

3 credits. Designed to develop an understanding of issues 
confronting the professional practitioner; emphasis on history, 
trends, issues of profession and their interrelatedness with 
sociocultural forces affecting the quality, nature and delivery of 
health care. The learner is expected to formulate a personal 
philosophy and to determine his or her commitment to the 
nursing profession. 

Nursing M4I40 

Nursing Management and Informatics 

3 credits. One of the major goals in the education of a 
professional nurse is directed at developing the ability to make 
decisions and judgments appropriate to the management of 
practice problems. Another goal is to facilitate an acceptance of 
a leadership role regardless of the employment setting. 

The nursing management and informatics course will provide 
theoretical knowledge and skills to understand organizations, to 
identify leadership behaviors and to utilize problem solving in 
reaching nursing management decisions. There is a focus on 
interrelating theories of management and leadership with nursing 
informatics and computer literacy. 



54 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


Nursing M4204 
Community Health Nursing 
for RNs (AMP) 

4 credits. This course focuses on the role of the professional 
nurse in community health with emphasis on use of the nursing 
process with aggregate diagnosis are analyzed within the context 
of nursing process. Current concepts of health promotion, 
disease prevention and rehabilitation are applied to the 
community as a whole and to individuals, families and groups 
over the life span. In addition, influences affecting family health 
(culture, violence, and abuse) are examined, as are the venues in 
which the nurse may encounter them (home, work and school). 

Nursing M4206 

Community Health Practicum 
for RNs (AMP) 

4-5 credits. Prerequisite or Corequisite: M4204 and M4050. 
Community Health Practicum for RNs is a clinical course for 
registered professional nurses. It builds upon previous 
knowledge and experience, and provides the student with an 
opportunity to apply community health nursing theory to clients 
and families in a community setting. This course allows the 
student to plan, deliver, and evaluate nursing services in the 
community at the baccalaureate level of practice. 

Nursing M4220 

Health Promotion Through the Life Span 

4 credits. This course consists of a series of nine modules 
concerning ages and stages throughout the normal/average 
human life cycle. Each module looks at biological/ 
neuromuscular, psychosexual, cognitive and interpersonal factors 
relevant to that age or stage. Each module contains a 
component that focuses on health promotion and disease 
prevention for that age or stage, including relevant nutritional 
concerns. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M4225 

The Science of Health Promotion and Disease 
Prevention 

3 credits. Promoting an optimum level of wellness and decreasing 
disease/injury are significant contributions professional nursing 
can make to individuals and society. In addition, this is a 
collaborative effort between the consumer and the health care 
provider. Recognizing that wellness and health can be achieved 
even in the presence of certain conditions (birth defects, chronic 
conditions) is an important philosophical starting point for the 
advanced practice nurse. It is the goal of nursing to promote 
health and optimal functioning. This course identifies and 
explores the influence of biologic, environmental and social 
factors on health and wellness of individuals. Strategies of health 
promotion and disease prevention for individuals, families, 
communities, and systems are explored. 


Nursing M4298 

Nursing Care of Adults in Health and Illness 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M4000, M4050, M4350, 
M4352, M4100. An intensive study of the major biophysical 
health problems affecting the adult population. The didactic 
component is designed to provide the student with a sound 
foundation in the nursing care of the adult. It is taken 
concurrently with M4300. 

Nursing M4300 

Practice in Adult Health Nursing 

3 credits. Corequisites: M4298. This course is designed to 
provide the student the experience to apply and integrate 
concepts from the course Nursing Care of Adults in Health and 
Illness in clinical settings. The clinical experience will enable the 
student to assess, plan, implement and evaluate nursing care for 
the adults and their families during illness. Clinical competencies 
and techniques are learned and applied in specific clinical 
situations. 

Nursing M4350 

Scientific and Philosophical Foundations of 
Nursing 

2 Credits. The biological and behavioral sciences inform the 
basics of nursing and the components of sharing. Differences 
between nursing and medicine in the practice of health care are 
explored. 

Nursing M4352 

Scientific and Philosophical Foundations of 
Nursing: Practicum 

3 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/14350, A/14353, A/14050, 
M4051. Guided opportunity to practice basic skills of nursing 
intervention. 

Nursing M4353 

Scientific and Philosophical Foundations of 
Nursing: Seminar 

1 Credit. Ongoing small group seminar discussions facilitated by 
faculty to explore dimensions of initial foundational nursing 
experiences. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 55 


Nursing M4470 

Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family 

3 credits. Prerequisite and Corequisites: M4000, M4050, M4108, 
M4225, M4350, M4352, M4353, M4472. This course focuses on 
the care of families during the childbearing years including 
prevention of disease and disability, maintenance of health and 
family functioning and restoration/rehabilitation after common 
acute or chronic illness. The processes of normal pregnancy, 
high risk pregnancy, and the care of healthy and ill infants and 
children through adolescence are presented. Using the nursing 
process, the concepts of individual, environment, and health as 
they pertain to the care of the family are emphasized. This 
course is offered concurrently with clinical experience. 

Nursing M447I 

Nursing Care of the Child-Rearing Family 

3 Credits. This course focuses on the care of families during the 
child-rearing years including prevention of disease and disability, 
maintenance of health and family functioning and restoration/ 
rehabilitation after common acute or chronic illness. The care of 
healthy and ill infants and children through adolescence is 
presented. Using the nursing process, the concepts of individual, 
environment, and health as they pertain to the care of the family 
are emphasized. This course is offered concurrently with a 
clinical component M4473 and has the same prerequisites as 
M4470. 

Nursing M4472 

Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family - 
Clinical 

2 credits. Prerequisite and Corequisites: A/14050, M4108, M4225, 
M4350, M4352, M4353, M4470. This clinical course focuses on the 
care of families during the childbearing years including prevention 
of disease and disability, maintenance of health and family 
functioning and restoration/rehabilitation after common acute or 
chronic illness. The concepts of individual, environment, and 
health as they pertain to the care of the family are emphasized. 
The course is offered concurrently with a didactic classroom 
course. 

Nursing M4473 

Nursing Care of the Child-Rearing Family 
Clinical 

3 Credits. Prerequisites: M4050, M4108, M4225, M4350, M4352, 
M4471. This clinical course focuses on the care of families during 
the child-rearing years including prevention of disease and 
disability, maintenance of health and family functioning and 
restoration/rehabilitation after common acute or chronic illness. 
The care of healthy and ill infants and children through 
adolescence are presented. Using the nursing process, the 
concepts of individual, environment, and health as they pertain to 
the care of the family are emphasized. This course is offered 
concurrently with a didactic classroom course. 


Nursing M45I8 

Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing/ 

Nursing M4520 Practicum 

2 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/14000, N\40S0, M4108, 
M4225, M4350, M4352, A/14353, M4520. Psychiatric / Mental 
Health Nursing explores the conceptual base of human 
psychopathology through the life span; assessment and 
identification, management of major mental health problems, and 
comprehensive nursing interventions. 

Nursing M4520 

Practicum: Psychiatric / Mental Health 
Nursing 

2-3 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/14000, A/14050, 
M4108, M4225, M4350, M4352, M4353, M4470, M4472, M4518. 
Guided clinical experience at in patient and out patient facilities in 
nursing interventions in major mental health problems. 

Nursing M460I 
Integration Seminar 

1 credit. Prerequisites and Corequisites: All core courses and lower 
division clinical courses; Nursing M4600, M4140. Nursing 
Integration Seminar is a course which builds on previously 
acquired knowledge and provides the student the opportunity to 
synthesize the skills and knowledge necessary to function as a 
beginning professional nurse. Care presentations drawn from 
concurrent clinical experience offer the student the opportunity 
to apply theoretical knowledge of preventive, therapeutic, and 
rehabilitative nursing care to clients, families, and aggregates in a 
variety of settings. Seminar discussion provides the student with 
the opportunity to apply concepts from both nursing and public 
health sciences in planning, delivering, and evaluating nursing 
services. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M4602 

Nursing Integration Practicum (ETP) 

5 Credits. Nursing Integration is a clinical course which builds on 
previously acquired knowledge and provides the student the 
opportunity to synthesize the skills and knowledge necessary to 
function as a beginning professional nurse. It offers the student 
the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge of preventive, 
therapeutic, and rehabilitative nursing care to clients, families, 
and aggregates. A variety of settings will provide the student 
with the opportunity to apply concepts from both nursing and 
public health sciences in planning, delivering, and evaluating 
nursing services. This course is no longer offered. 



56 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


Nursing M4882 

HIV/AIDS Community-based Care 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M4890 and A/14885. 

This course focuses on maintaining wellness in the community 
setting. There will also be emphasis on the diverse resources that 
patients can access in the community. Issues relevant to 
community health nursing are discussed. 

M4885 

HIV/AIDS Acute Care 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/14890. This course will 
focus on individuals who are experiencing acute HIV-related 
diseases requiring hospitalization. Pathophysiology of HIV 
infection, opportunistic infections, HIV-related malignancies, CNS 
manifestations, and other HIV related diseases requiring acute 
nursing care. One seminar and clinical day per week are 
required. 

Nursing M4890 

AIDS: Contemporary Issues and Challenges 

3 credits. Contemporary issues and challenges of providing care 
to individuals with HIV infection and AIDS are the foci of this 
course. Physiological, behavioral, emotional, and societal 
responses to AIDS are investigated. Implications for nursing 
research are considered. 

Nursing M5500 
Senior Colloquium 

3 Credits. Senior Colloquium is a clinical course which builds on 
previously acquired knowledge and provides the student the 
opportunity to synthesize the skills and knowledge necessary to 
function as a beginning professional nurse. It offers the student 
the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge of preventive, 
therapeutic, and rehabilitative nursing care to clients, families, 
and aggregates. A variety of settings will provide the student 
with the opportunity to apply concepts from nursing in planning, 
delivering, and evaluating nursing services. This course is no longer 
offered. 


Nursing M5900, M590I 
Residency in Clinical Nursing 

2-4 credits. This clinical nursing residency is designed for post¬ 
baccalaureate nursing students. It consists of clinical experiences 
in health care facilities which focus on strengthening and 
broadening the baccalaureate’s clinical attributes in patient care 
decision making and psychomotor skills. It is a prerequisite to 
graduate level clinical specialty programs for students with no 
work experience. The student engages in an intensive clinical 
experience ranging from 28-40 hours per week. Specific 
outcome objectives are identified by the program director of the 
clinical specialty masters program track that the student wishes 
to enter. The student meets regularly with the specialty masters 
program director or designee to discuss the clinical experience 
and identify progress in meeting the competencies. Clinical logs, 
seminars and reaction papers are requirements for completion. 
A/15901 is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6020 
Research I 

3 credits. This course will present an overview of the research 
process, from posing of the research problem to communication 
of the results, with emphasis on designs, methods, and evaluation 
of applied clinical research. This course or M8180 meet the 
research requirement for the Master’s core courses. This course 
is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6080 

Perinatal Nursing: Practicum 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6020 or A/18180, M6641. 
For perinatal clinical specialist and nurse practitioner students. 
Major focus of the course is developing, implementing, and 
evaluating interdisciplinary plans of care for patients and families 
who are experiencing low-risk pregnancies, as well as those 
whose pregnancies are high-risk. Such families are the major 
focus of the course. The student participates in care of a 
caseload of families in inpatient and outpatient settings. 

Nursing M6I00 
Advanced Physiology 

3-4 credits. The object of this course is to assist the student to 
understand human physiology on the molecular, cellular, organ 
and systematic levels. This will be accomplished through a series 
of lectures, assigned readings, and examinations. 

Nursing M6II0 

Pharmacology of Anesthetics 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites A/16124, A/16700, M6121. A 
comprehensive study of the pharmacokinetics and 
pharmacodynamics of drugs commonly used in anesthesia 
practice. In case studies and discussions, the complexity of their 
application is emphasized. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 57 


Nursing M6I2I 
Pathophysiology of Adult 

3 credits. Prerequisite: M6100. The pathogenesis of common 
conditions affecting adults will be presented. The discussions will 
focus on an understanding of the disease processes to allow 
logical, sequential, and precise therapeutic modalities. 

Nursing M6I22 
Pathophysiology of Child 

3 credits. Prerequisite: A/I6100. This course is required for 
students in Pediatric Primary Care and the Pediatric Specialty 
Care programs. The pathogenesis of common conditions 
affecting children is presented and serves a basis for clinical 
management. Relevant pharmacology is presented for each of 
the disease entities. 

Nursing M6I24 

Homeostatic Alterations During Anesthesia 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6100, M6110. A 
system approach to the homeostatic alterations occurring during 
anesthesia. Emphasis will be placed on cardiovascular, 
respiratory and neuroendocrine response to both surgical stress 
and the anesthetic agents. 

Nursing M6I40 

Advanced Assessment and Management of 
High Risk Neonates 

3 credits. Corequisite: M6141. This course provides an 
opportunity for inquiry into infant health care management, 
maintenance, and promotion. Course content provides the base 
for infant health assessment and the effects of imposition of high- 
risk factors on infant health. Emphasis is placed on the 
development of plans of health care management, evaluation. 

Nursing M6I4I 

Practicum: Advanced Assessment and 
Management of High Risk Neonates 

3 credits. Corequisite: A/16140. 

This course provides the opportunity for supervised practice in 
the acquisition of skills in infant health assessment, problem 
identification, and health care management and wellness 
promotion, including performance of selected invasive 
diagnostic/therapeutic procedures. Emphasis is placed on 
understanding the physiologic rationale and aims of plans of 
health care management. 

Nursing M6I50 

Maternal-Fetal-Newborn Physiology 

2 credits. Prerequisite and Corequisite: M6100. This course 
provides an overview of the physiology of reproduction, from 
gametogenesis through birth and the neonatal period. 


Nursing M6202 

Diagnosis and Management of the Emergency 
Patient I 

2 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/I 8810, M8815, M8785, 
M6838, M8816. This course is the first of two parts that focuses 
on the emergency subspecialty of critical care for the nurse 
practitioner. The diagnosis and management of emergency 
health problems encountered across the continuum of the acute 
/ non-acute emergency environment are studied in depth. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6203 

Diagnosis and Management of the Emergency 
Patient II 

2 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6202, M6839, M8055. 
This course is the second course that focuses on the emergency 
subspecialty of cardiopulmonary care for the nurse practitioner. 
The diagnosis and management of emergency health problems 
encountered across the continuum of the acute / non-acute 
emergency environment are studied in depth. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6300 

The Social Context of Illness and Health 

2 credits. This course examines the social context of illness and 
health, that is the social and political forces that affect the onset 
and maintenance of both illness and health. The role of 
advanced practice nurses in helping clients to avoid illness and 
maintain health will be explored. This course is a core course 
requirement for all Master’s students. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6340 

Advanced Practicum as an NNP 

6 credits. Prerequisite: M6140, M6141, M8661, A/18663, A/18666. 
Supervised clinical experience in which students integrate theory 
within the clinical setting. Emphasis is placed on refinement and 
perfection of decision-making skills in patient care management 
and development of the role of the neonatal nurse practitioner in 
education and collaboration. 

Nursing M6458 

Pelvic Assessment of the Adult Woman 

1 Credit. Corequisite: A/16460. A concentrated review of physical 
assessment and history taking for women, with special emphasis 
on the theory and skill of pelvic assessment. 



58 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


Nursing M6460 

Health Assessment and Primary Care of 
Women 

2 credits. Prerequisite or Corequisite: M6458. This course offers 
the theoretical knowledge necessary to meet the primary care 
needs of the adult woman throughout her lifetime. 

Nursing M6466 

Medical & Obstetrical Complications of 
Childbearing 

2 credits. Prerequisite: M8472 & M8473. This course explores 
potential complications requiring physician referral among 
childbearing women. 

Nursing M6480 

Professional Issues in Nurse-Midwifery 

1 credit. Professional Issues in Nurse-Midwifery is designed to 
concentrate on the transition from student to beginning nurse- 
midwife practitioner. It examines the history of the profession 
and the role of its leadership organizations. It examines the 
essential documents of the ACNM and its functions. It also looks 
at current critical issues that impact on the profession and 
discusses organizational and legislative means of effecting change. 

Nursing M65I0 

The Development of Human Behavior Across 
the Life Span 

3 Credits. This seminar course examines the development of 
human behavior across the life span. Within a developmental 
context, students will explore the dynamics of human behavior as 
they are determined by intrapersonal systems, interpersonal 
connections, societal patterns, cultural influences and as they are 
altered by significant life events. 

Nursing M6526 
Theory Development 

2 credits. This course teaches students to analyze and evaluate 
nursing theories, developing and using critical thinking skills as 
well as applying evaluative criteria to theory statements and 
practice patterns. Classic nursing theories and recent theory 
trends will be analyzed along with determining theoretical 
implications of trends in modern nursing practice, including 
advanced nursing practice. Relevance of theory for practice, 
research, and systematic thought processes will be stressed. This 
course is no longer offered. 


Nursing M6528 

The Development of Human Behavior Part I: 
Infancy to Adolescence 

2-3 credits. This course examines the development of human 
behavior in childhood and adolescence. Within this developmental 
context, students will explore the dynamics of human behavior as 
they are determined by intrapersonal systems, interpersonal 
connections, societal patterns, cultural influences and as they are 
altered by significant life events. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6529 

The Development of Human Behavior Part 
II: Adulthood 

2 credits. This course examines the continuing development of 
human behavior during young adulthood, middle adulthood and 
old age. Within this developmental context students will explore 
the dynamics of human behavior as they are determined by the 
intrapersonal systems, interpersonal connections, societal patterns, 
cultural influences and as they are altered by significant life events. 
This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6530 

The Development of Human Behavior 
Part I: Infancy to Adolescence 

2 Credits. This course examines the development of human 
behavior in childhood and adolescence. Within this 
developmental context students will explore the dynamics of 
human behavior as they are determined by the intrapersonal 
systems, interpersonal connections, societal patterns, cultural 
influences and as they are altered by significant life events. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6535 

Behavioral Health in Primary Care Advanced 
Nursing Practice 

1 Credit. This course explores the diagnosis and management of 
psychiatric and mental health issues commonly seen in 
community based primary care practices. 

Nursing M6594 
Psychopathology 

2 credits. Through weekly reading assignments and discussions, 
the student is introduced to the concepts central to major 
psychopathology. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 59 


Nursing M6597 

Evaluation and Assessment in Psychiatric 
Mental Health Nursing 

3 credits. Throughout the semester the student is introduced to 
the symptoms, behavioral manifestations and classification of 
psychopathology as compared to normative behavior during the 
life span. Special emphasis is placed upon the ability of the 
student to interview, classify and stigmatize observations. The 
student will use various assessment tools and guides with 
individuals of different ages. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6598 

Advanced Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing 
Assessment 

2 Credits. Throughout the semester the student is introduced to 
the symptoms, behavioral manifestations and classification of 
psychopathology as compared to normative behavior during the 
life span. Special emphasis is placed upon the ability of the 
student to interview, classify and evaluate observations. The 
student will use various assessment tools and guides with 
individuals of different ages. 

Nursing M6599 

Practicum in Advanced Psychiatric-Mental 
Health Nursing Assessment 

1 Credit. Throughout the semester the student is introduced to 
the symptoms, behavioral manifestations and classification of 
psychopathology as compared to normative behavior during the 
life span. Special emphasis is placed upon the ability of the 
student to interview, classify and evaluate observations. The 
student will use various assessment tools and guides with 
individuals of different ages. 

Nursing M66I0 

Physical and Psychological Assessment of the 
Child 

2 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Physical and 
Psychological Assessment of the Child is designed to prepare the 
student to take a complete health and developmental history of a 
normal child, perform a systematic physical examination, 
recognize physical and psychological health and developmental 
problems, and record findings using the problem-oriented 
method. 

Nursing M6620 

Pediatric Primary Care Nursing I 

3 credits. Corequisite: M6610. Pediatric Primary Care Nursing I 
is designed to prepare the student to provide primary care to 
infants, toddlers and preschoolers. It focuses upon the 
promotion of health and the prevention of illness, and the 
treatment of episodic problems in order that each child may 
meet his optimal physical, intellectual and emotional growth and 
development. 


Nursing M6622 

Pediatric Primary Care Nursing I: Clinical 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6610, M6620. 
Pediatric Primary Care Nursing I is designed to prepare the 
student to provide primary care to infants, toddlers, and 
preschoolers. It focuses upon the promotion of health and the 
prevention of illness in order that each child may meet his 
optimal physical, intellectual and emotional growth and 
development. The clinical experience involves well child care in a 
pediatric clinic, and a weekly clinical conference. 

Nursing M6624, M6625, and M6626 
Clinical Seminar in Pediatric Primary Care I, 

II, III 

1 Credit each. These seminar courses designed to discuss and 
interpret clinical experiences are no longer offered. 

Nursing M6630 

Pediatric Primary Care Nursing II 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6122, M6610, M6620, 
M6632. Pediatric Primary Care Nursing II focuses on the delivery 
of primary health care to school-age children and adolescents. 
This includes health promotion, the prevention of illness, and the 
management of common episodic problems. Using the schools 
for clinical experience, students will assess health status, teach 
individuals and groups of children, and will work with teachers 
and parents. Students will utilize knowledge of growth and 
development to develop age appropriate teaching plans, and 
assist children and families to assume active roles as health 
consumers. 

Nursing M6632, M6633, M6634 

Clinical Practicum: Pediatric Primary Care 

Nursing II 

5 credits; 2-3 credits; 2-3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: 

A/I6122, M6610, M6620, M6630, M6632. 

Students assess the health status of children in a variety of 
settings which must include continuity clinic and adolescent clinics 
and a school setting or inpatient setting. 

Nursing M665I 
Perinatal Nursing 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6020 or M8180, 

M6150. The role of the perinatal advanced practice nurse in the 
management of the childbearing woman and her fetus. The 
dynamics of pregnancy from both biophysical and psychosocial 
perspectives. After examining the management of patients and 
families who are experiencing low-risk pregnancies, most of the 
term focuses on the management of high-risk pregnancies. 
Emphasis is placed on clinical management of patients and related 
education, consultancy, and research activities. Developing 
interdisciplinary collaborative plans of care for pregnant families 
with prioritization of nursing interventions is highlighted. This 
course is offered concurrently with M6080. 



60 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


M6675 and M6659 
Perinatal Nursing II. 

This class and clinical are no longer offered. 

Nursing M6666 

Maternal and Infant Nutrition 

2 credits. Maternal and Infant Nutrition focuses on the 
requirements for adequate and maximal nutrient intake during 
the childbearing years. Physiology of pregnancy and the 
influence of nutritional status on pregnancy outcome, dietary 
management of common complications of pregnancy, cultural 
variations, infant needs, methods of infant feeding, and the 
requirements and advantages of lactation are stressed. Practical 
skills for assessment and intervention will be developed. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6720 

Introduction to Primary Care 

2 credits, 1 for GNPs. This course provides a systematic approach 
to understanding the delivery of primary health care to the well 
adult. In addition, various principles of illness prevention and 
health maintenance are introduced. 

Nursing M6725 

Health Policy and Advanced Practiced 
Nursing 

3 credits. This course will examine and critically analyze issues in 
health policy in the U.S. These issues will be explored in light of 
their impact on the nursing profession and on the current and 
future delivery of health care. This course is a core requirement 
for all Master’s students. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6728 

Theory and Research in Applied Science and 
Nursing 

4 Credits. This course will present an overview of theory and 
research as essential components of scholarly practice. The 
research process will be used, from posing of the research 
problem to communication of the results, with emphasis on 
designs, methods and evaluation of applied clinical theory and 
research. The course is designed to prepare expert, critical users 
of theory and research in practice. It is a required core course 
for a MS students. 


Nursing M6740 

Oncology Nursing Theory I - Fundamentals of 

Oncology Nursing (M8886) 

2 credits. This course presents a systematic overview of basic 
level oncology nursing utilizing various theoretical approaches. It 
incorporates the pathophysiology of cancer, prevention and 
detection, cancer treatment modalities, nursing diagnoses, and 
socioeconomic, ethical and legal issues related to cancer care. 

The course provides the framework for the synthesis, integration, 
and application of oncology nursing theory in clinical practice. 

Nursing M6745 

Oncology Nursing Practice I - Fundamentals 
of Oncology Nursing 

3 credits. Corequisite: Oncology Nursing Theory I. In this clinical 
course, the information learned in Theory I - Fundamentals of 
Oncology Nursing will be applied to a specifically designated 
oncology population receiving care in an oncology unit or 
division of a major hospital or medical center. The practice 
component offers the opportunity for the role of the oncology 
clinical nurse specialist to begin to be implemented. 

Nursing M6750 

Nursing Seminar in Gerontology I 

1 credit. This seminar provides the learner the opportunity to 
examine frequently occurring pathophysiologic problems found 
within the geriatric population. This didactic content 
complements the management course in the GNP/Adult Nurse 
Practitioner track. Topics selected for study include normal and 
abnormal system changes in the older adult. Specific assessment 
and intervention strategies will be covered. 

Nursing M675I 

Nursing Seminar in Gerontology II 

1 credit. This seminar will focus on the factors impacting on the 
care and management of the geriatric patient. Topics will include 
political, government, legal and ethical issues and syndromes that 
impact on the geriatric client and the health care team. The 
GNP student will assess the multifactorial influences in the 
management of the elderly client. 

Nursing M6758 

Nutrition Through the Lifespan 

1 credit. This course provides advanced content in nutritional 
assessment methods and intervention strategies for primary care 
clients throughout the lifespan with a focus on promotion of 
optimum nutrition at various points in the life cycle. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 


Nursing M6760 

Primary Care of Women Across the Lifespan I 

2 Credits. Informed by an underlying theoretical framework 
acknowledging that women’s health is inextricably linked to the 
nature of their lives, this course focuses on wellness, health 
promotion and advanced clinical diagnosis and treatment of 
women’s physical health problems. Provides knowledge to the 
beginning women’s health care provider to meet selected 
primary care needs affecting the skin, HEENT, respiratory, 
gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal systems of adolescents to the 
very elderly. 

Nursing M6775 

Health Promotion of the Elderly 

3 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6900, M8787, M8770, 
A/16720, M8864, M6750. This course explores the theoretical 
dimensions of health aging and discusses health promotion and 
disease prevention strategies in gerontology. 

Nursing M6830 
Critical Care I 

3 credits. Prerequisites or Corequisites: M6020, M6041, M8521. 
This course presents a systematic research and theory based 
introduction to the concepts underlying critical care nursing. 
Emphasis is placed on the nurse’s role in assessing and evaluating 
human responses to actual or potential threat in the hospital 
environment. The approach used is to examine the nature and 
substance of advanced clinical practice in critical care from a 
conceptual perspective across age groups and physical condition. 
The phenomena selected for examination are viewed as clinical 
problems with the potential to cause multiple and complex 
interactions, and are based on AACN’s Adult Critical Care Exam 
Blueprint. Focus will be cardiovascular and pulmonary 
phenomena. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6832 

Diagnosis and Management of the Critically III 
for the Intensivist I 

2 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16839, A/18825. This 
course is the first of two courses that focuses on the intensivist 
subspecialty of critical care for the nurse practitioner. The 
diagnosis and management of health problems encountered 
across the continuum of the acute / critical care environment are 
studied in depth. This course is no longer offered. 


Nursing M6833 

Diagnosis and Management of the Critically III 
for the Intensivist II 

2 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16839, A/18825. This 
course is the second course that focuses on the intensivist 
subspecialty of critical care for the nurse practitioner. The 
diagnosis and management of health problems encountered 
across the continuum of the acute / critical care environment are 
studied in depth. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M6838 and M6839 

Diagnosis and Management of the Critically/ 

Acutely III Adult, I and II 

2-3 Credits each. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16700, M8102, 
M8787, A/18815. A systematic exploration of advanced diagnosis 
and management techniques in caring for acutely and critically ill 
adults. This course is offered with a companion clinical course. 

Nursing M6862 

Assessment, Evaluation, and Management of 
the Perioperative Patient 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6100, M6120, M6124, 
M6110. History and physical examination techniques aimed at 
identifying pathology and its effect on the anesthetic process 
rather than diagnose disease entities will be stressed. Students 
will evaluate the information obtained in their physical and 
psychological assessment and synthesize that knowledge to 
formulate individualized perioperative anesthesia management 
plans. Emphasis will be placed on management of patients with 
altered cardiovascular, pulmonary and neural-renal status. 

Nursing M6868 

Regional Anesthesia, Theories and Technique 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6100, M6110, M6870. 
This is a basic course in the pharmacology of local anesthetics 
and their application in clinical practice. The theory and 
techniques of infiltration, peripheral nerve block, central neural 
blockade, and topical anesthesia are discussed in relation to their 
clinical application, both intraoperatively and postoperatively for 
long-term pain management. Through case studies and analysis 
of current research, complications and alternate methods are 
emphasized. 

Nursing M6870 

Basic Principles of Nurse 

Anesthesia Practice 

4 credits. Prerequisite: A/16100, M6110, M6124, A/16125, M6862. The 
various methods and techniques of anesthesia administration, 
with emphasis on physiological basis for practice are the focus of 
the course. Function and maintenance of various kinds of 
technologies, as well as the psychomotor skills specific to the 
practice are stressed. 



62 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


Nursing M687I 
Advanced Principles of 
Anesthesia Practice I 

2 credits. Prerequisite and Corequisite: All first level didactic and 
clinical anesthesia courses. This advanced approach to anesthesia 
principles is applied to specific surgical procedures both elective 
and emergent. The physiological sequela of surgical procedures 
and their impact on homeostatic mechanisms of the patient are 
stressed. Neurological, cardiothoracic, and obstetrical 
procedures, as well as pediatric and geriatric considerations are 
included. Seminar format facilitates integration of knowledge. 

Nursing M6872 
Advanced Principles of 
Anesthesia Practice II 

2 credits. Prerequisite M6871. This course is essentially a 
continuation of Advanced Principles I. A system approach will be 
employed to discuss the various types of surgical patients and 
problems that the student will be challenged with when caring 
for them. We will look at the various different surgical 
procedures in some detail, including preop assessment, planning 
for the intraoperative events, and caring for the patient in the 
postop period. Also to be discussed will be the types of patients 
likely to present for each particular procedure, and the unique 
problems that types of patients will challenge us with in caring for 
them throughout their operative course. 

Nursing M6875 

Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia 
Practice 

2 credits. In a seminar format, the professional, legal, and 
regulatory aspects of nurse anesthesia practice in the U.S. will be 
analyzed. 

Nursing M6880 

Oncology Nursing Theory II: Advanced 
Oncology Nursing 

2 credits. Prerequisite: Oncology Nursing Theory I and Practice I (for 
CNS students), or Advanced Standing. This course presents a 
systematic overview of advanced oncology nursing utilizing various 
theoretical approaches. It presents the medical and nursing 
management of symptoms and specific cancers, and provides a 
framework of advanced practice for the oncology clinical course 
specialist (OCNS) or nurse practitioner (NP). This framework 
assists the OCNS/NP in diagnosing, assessing, intervening in, and 
evaluating potential and actual client/family problems related to 
cancer treatment, rehabilitation and terminal care. 


Nursing M6885 

Oncology Nursing Practice II: Advanced 
Oncology Nursing 

3 credits. Prerequisite and Corequisite: Oncology Nursing Theory 
and Practice I, or Advanced Standing; Oncology Nursing Theory II. In 
this clinical course, for clinical nurse specialist students, the 
information learned in oncology Nursing Theory II - Advanced 
Oncology Nursing will be applied to a specifically designated 
oncology population receiving care in an oncology unit or 
division of a major hospital, medical center, community or 
institutional setting. The practice component offers the 
opportunity for the educator, consultant and/or coordinator 
role of the oncology clinical nurse specialist to begin to be 
implemented. 

Nursing M6905 

Clinical Research Study Coordination 

2 Credits. This course addresses the conduct of clinical trials 
from the perspective of the clinical research coordinator. 

Content will include the nature and conduct of clinical trials. 
Federal guidelines and regulations, basic statistics, research 
design, sampling and subject recruitment, elements of good 
clinical practice, and the role of the clinical research coordinator 
during planning, start-up, implementation and termination phases 
of the project. 

Nursing M6907 

Clinical Research Practicum 

3 Credits. An individualized practicum experience in which the 
student participates as a member of one or more teams carrying 
out or evaluating randomized clinical trials. The practicum is 
designed to provide the student with “hands-on” experience 
working as a member of the research team and/or monitoring 
clinical drug or device trials being carried out in in-patient, 
ambulatory or community settings. 

Nursing M6920 

Health and Social Policy: The Context for 
Practice and Research 

4 Credits. This course examines contextual contributors to health 
status and relevant current U.S. social and health policies. Issues 
are explored with a particular emphasis on the impact they have 
on the current and future delivery of health care and on 
advanced practice nursing. This course is required for all MS 
students. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 


Nursing M6930 

Interpersonal Violence and Abuse: 

Prevention, Assessment and Intervention for 
Health Care Professionals 

1 Credit. This course increases awareness of the prevalence of 
interpersonal violence and abuse in individuals and families, 
providing content needed for prevention, earl/ identification, 
assessment and intervention/referral. 

Nursing M6940 

Management and Advanced Practice Nursing 

1 Credit. This course explores the dimensions of independent 
advanced practice nursing in a challenging and constantly 
changing health care environment. Legal, regulatory, billing, 
reimbursement and practice configurations are discussed. 

Nursing M8040 

Practicum in Emergency Care for the Nurse 
Practitioner 

4 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/18785, A/18810, A/18875, 
M6838, A/16202 or M6832. The practicum in emergency care for 
the nurse practitioner is designed to provide the student with 
practice experiences to develop skills of assessment, diagnosis 
and management of the emergency patient. The student has the 
opportunity to integrate and synthesize theory, clinical research, 
advanced therapeutics and decision making in this closely 
supervised precepted experience. The role of the nurse 
practitioner is applied in the clinical setting. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M8050 

Advanced Practicum in Emergency Care for 
the Nurse Practitioner 

3 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6838, M8102. The 
practicum in emergency care for the nurse practitioner is 
designed to provide the student with practice experiences to 
develop skills of assessment, diagnosis and management of the 
emergency patient. The student has the opportunity to integrate 
and synthesize theory, clinical research, advanced therapeutics 
and decision making in this closely supervised precepted 
experience. The role of the nurse practitioner is applied in the 
clinical setting of the Emergency Department. Permission of the 
program director is required. 


Nursing M8055 

Integration Practicum in Emergency Care for 
the Nurse Practitioner 

4 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: /V16838, M6202, A/18040, 
A/18050, A/16839, A/16203. The practicum in critical care for the 
nurse practitioner is designed to provide the student with 
practice experiences to develop skills of assessment, diagnosis 
and management of the emergency patient. The student has the 
opportunity to integrate and synthesize theory, clinical research, 
advanced therapeutics and decision making in this closely 
supervised precepted experience. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M8I02 
Advanced Pharmacology 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16700, M4100. This is 
an advanced course in the pharmacodynamics and 
pharmacokinetics of drugs used in the therapeutic management 
of common pathophysiological states. It also includes the 
principles and regulations surrounding prescription writing, 
pursuant to NYS and federal requirements for advanced nurse/ 
practitioner practice. A similar course, M8661, is offered in 
advanced pediatric pharmacology. 

Nursing M8II0 

Pharmacology of Accessory Drugs 

2 Credits. A comprehensive study of the pharmacokinetics and 
pharmacodynamics of concurrent drug therapy and their 
anesthetic implications. 

Nursing M8I60 
Genetic Concentration 

2 Credits. Prerequisite: M8290. This course is designed for the 
student who is interested in increasing knowledge in a specific 
area of genetic theory relevant to practice. The student will 
choose an appropriate faculty mentor to be a guide in this 
concentration. 

Nursing M8I65 

Practicum: Genetic Concentration 

2 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M8290, M8150. This 
clinical practicum is designed for the student who is interested in 
increasing practice skills in providing care to clients with (or at 
risk) for (a) specific genetic disorder(s). The student will choose 
an appropriate faculty mentor to be a guide in this practicum. 
Details of the practicum will be negotiated by the student, faculty 
mentor, and appropriate agency mentor. 



64 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


Nursing M8I80 

Clinical Epidemiology for Advanced Practice 
Nurses 

3 credits. An overview of the principles and practice of clinically 
oriented epidemiology. Includes the role of epidemiology in 
health care and public health, basic concepts in epidemiology and 
biostatistics, critical evaluation of health literature, as well as 
applications to clinical practice. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M8290 

Incorporating Genetics into Advanced 
Nursing Practice 

3 Credits. This course will introduce students to clinical genetic 
theory incorporating new information from the human genome 
project, the history and evolution of genetic counseling, including 
the ethical, moral and legal issues which arise daily in this rapidly 
developing field. This course is intended to add to the 
knowledge base of advanced practice nurses so that they will 
increase their sensitivity to the issues confronting families at risk 
for or with genetic disorders. 

Nursing M8330 

The Consultation/Liaison Process in Advanced 
Nursing Practice 

3 credits. This seminar will introduce the student to the 
consultation/liaison process and its application in a variety of 
health care and community settings. The knowledge gained will 
enhance the effectiveness of the advanced practice nurse. 

Nursing M8460 

Comprehensive Women’s Health 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/14050, A/18462, A/18464. 
This course addresses health issues throughout a woman s life 
span. It includes an overview of disorders that occur mainly in 
women and the role of the nurse practitioner in managing care of 
the adult female. Topics related to gynecologic health including 
deviations and non-gynecologic medical problems are presented. 
Concurrent supervised clinical experiences are required. 

Nursing M8462 

Practicum in Comprehensive Women’s 
Health 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/14050, A/18462, A/18464. 
Supervised clinical experiences focus on applicaiton of history 
taking and physical examination skills, collaborative diagnosis, and 
management of women’s health throughout the life span. 
Emphasis is placed on the nurse practitioner role in care of the 
adult nonpregnant female in ambulatory settings. 


Nursing M8464 

Advanced Clinical Assessment in Women’s 
Health 

3 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/14050, M6100. This 
course explores the theoretical dimensions of advanced clinical 
assessment of women through the life cycle with particular focus 
on the theory and skill of pelvic assessment. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M8465 

Primary Care of Women Across the Life Span II 

2 Credits. Builds on Primary Care of Women Across the Life 
Span I, this course focuses on advanced clinical diagnosis and 
treatment of select women’s physical health problems. Provides 
knowledge for the women’s health care provider to meet 
selected primary care needs related to infectious disease, 
autoimmune disease and the cardiac, hematological, neurological, 
metabolic, and endocrine systems. 

Nursing M8468 

Advanced Seminar and Practicum in 
Women’s Health 

3-6 Credits. Prerequisites: A/16080, A/16657, A/18460, A/18462. This 
course is designed to facilitate implementation of the advanced 
nursing practice role in the care of parents and infants, and 
oriented toward meeting the expressed learning needs of 
individual students. Students will have opportunity to acquire 
skills under direction and supervision of a clinical mentor. 

Students will be expected to practice with increasing 
independence in an advanced nursing practice role. 

Nursing M847I 

Normal Antepartum: Didactic 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16666, M6150, A/18472. 
An overview of the principles and practice of clinical care during 
the antepartum and theoretical topics include the public health, 
physiological, psychological and emotional basis for prenatal care. 
The practical applications cover clinical midwifery management in 
the antepartum period, assessment of fetal growth and 
development, nutritional assessment and management, evaluation 
of the family unit, and teaching/counseling considerations. 

Nursing M8472 

Normal Antepartum: Clinical 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16100, M6150, A/16666, 
A/18477. This course covers the broad scope of prenatal care and 
includes: The history and physical examination techniques aimed 
at understanding the normal parameters of pregnancy, and 
recognizing any deviations from normal in the pregnant woman/ 
family or the fetus; The physiological, social, emotional, and 
educational components of antepartum care; Clinical practice 
includes nurse-midwifery management of the care of the normal 
antepartum woman/family, screening for high-risk pregnancies, 
and co-management or referral of high-risk pregnancies. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 


Nursing M8473 
Intrapartum: Clinical 

2-3 credits. Prerequisite: M8476 & 8477, M8479, M8478, M6100, 
M6150, A/16460, A/16666. Clinical experience includes 16-20 hours 
per week in nurse midwifery management of labor and delivery 
of childbearing women. Experience on the postpartum ward and 
in the newborn nursery is obtained in this clinical rotation when 
intrapartum patients are not available. 

Nursing M8475 

Clinical Residency in Nurse-Midwifery 

2-5 credits. Prerequisite: M8476 & N\8477, M8471 & A/I 8472, M8479 
& A/18473, M6466. Nurse-Midwifery services provide intensive 
clinical experience in all areas of nurse-midwifery practice. 

Direct student teaching is provided by nurse-midwifery 
preceptors affiliated with the program. 

Nursing M8476 

Well Woman Gynecology: Didactic 

2 credits. Well Woman Gynecology is designed to concentrate 
on the physical, emotional, and educational needs of the 
essentially healthy woman. It covers a variety of topics including: 
health maintenance, gynecologic screening, family planning, 
sexuality and sexual dysfunction, and the late (4-6 week) 
postpartum period. 

Nursing M8477 

Well Woman Gynecology: Clinical 

2 credits. Well Woman Gynecology Clinical is designed to 
concentrate on the physical, emotional, and educational needs of 
the essentially healthy woman. It provides clinical experience in 
health maintenance, gynecologic screening, family planning, 
sexuality and sexual dysfunction, and the late (4-6 week) 
postpartum period. 

Nursing M8478 

Breastfeeding, Postpartum, and 
Newborn Care 

2 credits. This course provides theoretical and practical 
knowledge of the immediate postpartum period and the 
neonate. Normal physiology and family centered management 
skills are emphasized. Pathophysiology is also covered with 
various interventions when deviations from the normal are 
encountered. 

Nursing M8479 
Normal Intrapartum 

2-3 credits. Prerequisite: M8476, N\8477, M8473, M8478, M6100, 
A/16750, A/16460, A46666. The course is offered for eight weeks in 
the Spring. The first week consists of four days of seminars with 
focus on orientation to the module and basic information that 
will allow students to begin clinical with a sound theoretical base. 
For the remainder of the course, there are four hours of seminar 
each week. 


Nursing M8482 

Primary Care of Childbearing Women 

3 Credits. An overview of the principles and practice of primary 
care during the prenatal and postpartum period. The focus is on 
normal antepartum and postpartum. The physiological, 
psychological, emotional and social basis for prenatal care will be 
examined in the theoretical context of public health. Topics 
include the management in the woman throughout the 
antepartum period, assessment of fetal growth and development, 
evaluation of the family unit, and teaching/counseling 
considerations. 

Nursing M8545 

Diagnosis and Management of Illness 
in Families I 

4 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/18557, A/16700, A/18785; 
A/16727, M8102, A18558, A/18693, or M8625. Utilizing a systems 
approach, the diagnosis and management of problems 
encountered in Primary Care are studied. Topics selected for 
study include cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine, 
respiratory, and hematology. The identification and management 
of clinical problems are emphasized. The role of the nurse 
practitioner in a collaborative model is discussed. 

Nursing M8546 

Diagnosis and Management of Illness 
in Families II 

4 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A48557, A/18558, A46700, 
M8785, A/16727, M8625, M8693 or M8625-, M8559, M8567 or M8850. 
Utilizing a systems approach, the diagnosis and management of 
problems encountered in Primary Care are studied. Among the 
selected systems for study are neurological, dermatological, 
musculoskeletal, opthamological, psychological, and 
immunological. 

Nursing M8557 
Family Primary Care I 

2 credits. Corequisite: A/18785. This course is designed to 
introduce the student to the role of the nurse practitioner as a 
provider of community centered family primary care. The focus 
will be on health maintenance and illness prevention. 

Nursing M8558 
Family Primary Care II 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/18557, A/18785, A46700; 
A/18625 or M8693, M8770. This required course is designed to 
prepare the advanced practice student to provide primary care 
to individuals through the life span. Utilizing lectures and case 
presentation the role of the FNP in the diagnosis and 
management of commonly encountered illnesses are studied. 



66 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


Nursing M8559 
Family Primary Care III 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M8557, A/18558; A/18771, 
AA8850, or M8566, M8567. This required course is designed to 
further develop the role of advanced practice student, in the 
provision of primary care to individuals and families, through the 
life span in a variety of clinical settings. Utilizing lectures and case 
presentations, the role of the FNP in the diagnosis and 
management of commonly encountered illnesses are studied. A 
formal clinical presentation is required. 

Nursing M8560 

Family Theory in Context 

2-3 credits. Prerequisites or Corequisites: M6020 or M8180. This 
course is an introduction to family theory. It introduces the 
student to a new epistemology, one in which the central concepts 
stress a picture of causality that is circular, rather than the linear 
view of causality. Concepts of the family as a system and 
theoretical models upon which to base clinical practice will be 
discussed. The course will apply family systems concepts and 
methods to problems related to health and illness faced by 
families. Basic skills of genogram construction, assessment of 
family life cycle events and transition periods will be 
demonstrated. Readings, videotapes, case presentations and 
discussions will be used to explore theoretical and practical issues 
related to a family systems approach to working with physically 
and mentally ill patients and their families. 

Nursing M8562 

Practice of Family Therapy 

2 credits. Prerequisite: A/18560, A/18590, M8591. This clinical 
practice course is designed for students to develop clinical skills in 
family therapy based on a structural family therapy model. It 
consists of clinical practice and supervision. 

Nursing M8566 
Family Primary Care: 

Practicum IIIA 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corerequisites: A/18770, M8625; 
A/18670, A/18771. Students assess the health status of individuals of 
all ages in selected settings and recognize and manage common 
health problems in the pediatric and adult population. 

Nursing M8567 

Family Primary Care: Practicum IIIB 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/18770, M8625, A/18670, 
A/18771. Students assess the health status of individuals of all ages 
in selected settings and recognize and manage common health 
problems in the pediatric and adult population. 


Nursing M8569 

Advanced Clinical Assessment in Primary 
Care 

3 Credits. This course has three components: 

1. Advanced Physical Assessment 

2. Clinical Evaluation 

3. Clinical Lectures 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M857I 

Seminar on Family Therapy and Technique 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/18590, A/18591, A/18560. 
This course focuses on an integrated systems approach, including 
structural, Bowenian, and the multicontextual framework and is 
designed to assist the student in integrating the theoretical and 
practical aspects of the systems approach to treating families. 

The course will review the basic issues involved in psychiatric 
diagnosis and abnormal psychopathology from a systems 
perspective. Videotape review, didactic materials, class 
presentation, and discussion will provide a comprehensive 
theoretical basis for the understanding and development of more 
advanced clinical skills. 

Nursing M8588 

Theory of Group Psychotherapy 

2 Credits. This course is designed to increase the student’s 
understanding of the key concepts, the dynamics, and 
development of psychotherapy groups. Students are encouraged 
to explore the theoretical issues inherent in group practice and 
their relationship to psychiatric nursing theory and practice. 
Students will address the developmental needs of clients as they 
relate to the group experience. 

Nursing M8590 

Theory and Practice of Individual 
Psychotherapy I 

2 credits. Prerequisite: A/16597, A/16528. Each student is given an 
opportunity to work with 1-2 individuals assigned according to 
the student’s needs for a learning experience. Students arrange 
for clinical contact with the assigned clients. Clinical contact must 
be at least weekly and more often if required. The student is 
responsible for assessing the biophysical, psychosocial, cultural, 
cognitive and spiritual dimensions of the clients. Based upon this 
assessment the student plans appropriate interventions. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 


Nursing M859I 

Theory and Practice of Individual 
Psychotherapy II 

2 credits. Prerequisite: A/16597, M6528, M8590. Each student is 
given an opportunity to work with 1-2 individuals assigned 
according to the student’s need for a learning experience. 
Students arrange for clinical contact with assigned clients. Clinical 
contact must be at least weekly and more often if required. The 
student is responsible for evaluating the interrelatedness of the 
biophysical, psychosocial, cognitive, cultural, and spiritual 
dimensions of the clients. Based upon evaluation, the student 
utilizes appropriate therapeutic interventions which she evaluates 
in terms of the client’s responses. The student is responsible to 
work on termination issues with the client. 

Nursing M8592 

Clinical Practice and Supervision with Groups 

2 credits. Prerequisite and Corerequisites: A/18590, M6528; M6588. 
The student participates as a leader or co-leader in a 
psychotherapeutic group of 10-12 sessions. Clinical supervision is 
focused on group dynamics and development. 

Nursing M8594 

Advanced Practice in Psychiatric Mental 
Health Nursing I 

3 credits. Prerequisite: M6530, M6594, M6597, M8590, M8591, 
M8592. Or Corequisite: M8562. This course is designed to 
integrate foundation skills and strengthen the student’s clinical 
practice in a variety of psychiatric mental health settings. The 
practicum is the first of two consecutive courses. Expectations of 
the clinical experience are direct client contact and therapeutic 
interaction with staff, families, and systems. The student will 
develop a knowledge base and skills germane to the role of the 
advanced practice psychiatric nurse. Details of the practicum will 
be coordinated with the agency and faculty, with consideration of 
course objectives, agency objectives and student career goals. 

Nursing M8595 

Advanced Practice in Psychiatric Mental 
Health Nursing II 

3 credits. Prerequisite: Advanced Practice in Psychiatric Mental 
Nursing I. This course is designed to advance the student’s clinical 
practice with clients in a variety of psychiatric mental health 
settings. The practicum is the second of two consecutive 
courses. Expectations of the clinical experience are direct client 
contact and therapeutic interaction with staff, families, and 
systems. The student will evaluate the roles of the advanced 
practice psychiatric nurse. Details of the practicum will be 
coordinated with the student, agency and faculty based upon course 
objectives, clinical objectives and student career goals. 


Nursing M8625 

Family Primary Care: Practicum II 

4 credits. Prerequisite: M6840, M6100, M8557. Corequisite: 
M8770, A/18558, A/16121. The clinical practicum is designed to 
prepare the students to provide primary health care in a variety 
of settings. Initially, the student will obtain complete histories, 
perform physical examinations, and developmental assessments. 
Subsequently, the student will focus on the recognition and 
management of common problems. The clinical experience will 
familiarize the student with age appropriate physical, cognitive 
and emotional development as well as routine episodic care. The 
goal of the practicum is to prepare the students for the delivery of 
family focused primary care. 

Nursing M8640 

Advanced Seminar and Practicum in 
Women’s Health 

3-6 credits. Prerequisite: M6651, A/16080, M8460, M8462. This 
course is designed to facilitate implementation of the advanced 
nursing practice role in the care of parents and infants, and 
oriented toward meeting the expressed learning needs of 
individual students. Students will have opportunity to acquire 
skills under direction and supervision of a clinical mentor. 
Students will be expected to practice with increasing 
independence in an advanced nursing practice role. 

Nursing M866I 

Advanced Pediatric and Neonatal 
Pharmacology 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16100, A/14100. This 
course provides an opportunity for the scientific inquiry into the 
use of pharmacologic agents in the advanced nursing care of 
infants, including fetal, neonatal life and early childhood and 
adolescence. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug use in 
pregnancy and lactation, pharmacologic agents used in disease 
prevention and treatment, drug monitoring and drug safety in 
the home are explored. Proper prescribing and record keeping 
in accordance with New York and Federal laws are addressed. 

Nursing M8663 

Pathophysiology and Management of the High 
Risk Neonate 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6140, M6141; A/18666, 
A/18661. This course introduces the advanced student to a 
systematic approach to critical care. Emphasis is placed on 
understanding the pathophysiology of various neonatal 
conditions, including neurological, respiratory, endocrine, renal, 
cardiovascular, and metabolic. 



Nursing M8665 

Practicum in Adult Acute Care 

4 credits. Prerequisite: A/18783. The practicum is a clinical field 
experience designed to provide opportunity for students to 
refine skills in assessment, decision-making, and management of 
care for adults with a variety of episodic and long-term health 
problems in the acute care setting. Students in the clinical setting 
are to function more independently under preceptor supervision. 
This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M8666 

Practicum: Pathophysiology and Management 
of the High Risk Neonate 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6140, M6141; A/18663, 
A/18667. This course is an in-depth practicum which allows the 
NNP student to utilize all previous learning in his/her 
management of infants at risk. The practicum will provide the 
NNP student with the opportunity to apply his/her knowledge to 
selected high-risk neonates. It will be an intensive experience in 
which the student will analyze all available data, synthesize his/her 
thinking, implement the plan of care and evaluate the results. The 
student will refine collaborative skills with physicians, nurses and 
other allied health personnel through the course. 

Nursing M8670 

Pediatric Primary Care Nursing III 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16670, A/16620, A/16630, 
A/16632, A/16122; M8674. This required course in the PNP major 
introduces the advanced student to the provision of health care to 
children with common episodic illnesses. Lectures and seminars 
provide the student with the knowledge base to recognize and 
manage common health problems in the pediatric population. 

Nursing M8672, M8673, M8674 

Pediatric Primary Care Nursing III: Clinical 

4 credits - A/18672, 2 credits - A/18673, 2 credits - M8674. Prerequisites 
and Corequisites: A/16610, A/16620, M6630, A/I 6632; A/18670. This 
practicum focuses on the delivery of episodic illness care to children 
and adolescents in the ambulatory settings; and on planning and 
managing the care of hospitalized children. The Pediatric Clinic is 
the main clinical setting. Here the student will learn how to assess 
children with common episodic illnesses, to develop and discuss 
differential diagnosis, to manage the care of children with minor 
illnesses and to work with other health professionals collaboratively. 
When the illness requires hospitalization, they will design and 
implement a plan of care, including discharge plans and teaching. 
Students utilize their knowledge of common child and adolescent 
illnesses and the information presented in M6630 and M8670 to 
assess and develop plans of care for all children and adolescents. 


Nursing M8693 

Family Primary Care: Practicum IIA 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16840, M6100, A/18557; 
A/18770, A/18558, M6121. The clinical practicum is designed to 
prepare the students to provide primary health care in a variety 
of settings. Initially, the student will obtain complete histories, 
perform physical examinations, and developmental assessments. 
Subsequently, the student will focus on the recognition and 
management of common problems. The clinical experience will 
familiarize the student with age appropriate physical, cognitive 
and emotional development as well as routine episodic care. The 
goal of the practicum is to prepare the students for the delivery 
of family focused primary care. 

Nursing M8746 

Clinical Specialization in Oncology Nursing I 

2-3 credits. Prerequisite: Oncology Nursing Theory/Practice I (or 
Advanced Standing), Oncology Nursing Theory/Practice II and III. 

This course provides the opportunity for clinical specialization in 
an area of oncology nursing selected by student. Learning is 
facilitated by a preceptor with recognized expertise in the 
particular clinical area. An in-depth familiarity with the nursing 
research literature related to the clinical area is developed and 
research-based clinical project is proposed. 

This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M8747 

Clinical Specialization in Oncology Nursing II 

2- 3 credits. Prerequisite: Oncology Nursing Theory/Practice I (or 
Advanced Standing), Oncology Nursing Theory/Practice II and III. 

This course provides the opportunity for clinical specialization in 
an area of oncology nursing selected by student. Learning is 
facilitated by a preceptor with recognized expertise in the 
particular clinical area. In this course, a research-based clinical 
project may be implemented. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing 8770 

Diagnosis and Management of 
Illness in Adults I 

3- 4 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6720, M6100, M8785; 
M6121, A/18772. Utilizing a systems approach, the diagnosis and 
management of health problems encountered in primary care of 
adult are studied in depth. Systems selected for study include 
cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine and respiratory. The 
course and management of clinical problems are emphasized, as 
well as the care provided by nurse practitioners. 


COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 


Nursing M877I 

Diagnosis and Management of 
Illness in Adults II 

3-4 credits. Prerequisite: M8770. Utilizing a systems approach, 
the diagnosis and management of health problems encountered 
in Primary Adult Care are studied. Systems selected for study 
include genitourinary, respiratory, immune systems, central 
nervous and musculoskeletal. 

Nursing M8772 

Practicum in Adult Primary Care I 

4 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16720, M6100, M8785; 
M8770, M6121. The practicum is a clinical field experience 
designed to provide opportunity for students to acquire skills in 
assessment, decision-making and management of care for adults 
with a variety of episodic and long-term health problems. The 
roles of the adult/geriatric nurse practitioner are applied in 
clinical settings that include ambulatory care facilities, community 
health centers, diagnostic and screening centers. 

Nursing M8773 

Practicum in Adult Primary Care II 

3 credits. Prerequisite: M8772. The practicum is a clinical field 
experience designed to provide opportunity for students to 
strengthen skills in assessment, decision-making, and 
management of care for adults with a variety of episodic and 
long-term health problems. Students in the clinical settings 
function more independently under preceptor supervision. 

Nursing M8776 

Advanced Practicum in Primary Care 

2 credits. Corequisite: M8771. The practicum is a clinical field 
experience designed to provide opportunity for students to 
refine skills in assessment, decision-making, and management of 
care for adults with a variety of episodic and long-term health 
problems. Students in the clinical setting are to function more 
independently under preceptor supervision. 

Nursing M8778 

Advanced Practicum in Geriatric Primary 
Care 

2 Credits. Corequisite: M8771. The practicum is a clinical field 
experience designed to provide opportunity for students to 
refine skills in assessment, decision-making, and management of 
care for elderly adults with a variety of episodic and long-term 
health problems. Students in the clinical setting are to function 
more independently under preceptor supervision. 


Nursing M8783 

Acute Care Management of Adults I 

3 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6720, M6100, M8785; 
M6121, M8772, A/18770. Utilizing a systems approach, the diagnosis 
and management of health problems encountered in acute care 
of adult are studied in depth. Systems selected for study include 
cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine and respiratory. The 
course and management of clinical problems are emphasized, as 
well as the care provided by nurse practitioners. See M8665 for 
related clinical experience. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M8784 

Acute Care Management of Adults II 

3 credits. Prerequisite: A/18783. Utilizing a systems approach, the 
diagnosis and management of health problems encountered in 
Acute Care of the Adult are studied. Systems selected for study 
include genitourinary, respiratory, immune systems, central 
nervous, and musculoskeletal. See M8665 for related clinical 
experience. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M8786 

Advanced Clinical Assessment in Adults 

2-3 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M4050, A/16100, M6121, 
N\b720. This course explores the theoretical dimensions of 
advanced clinical assessment of adults and incorporates advanced 
techniques of history taking and physical examination. 

Nursing M8787 

Practicum in Advanced Clinical Assessment 
for Adults 

1 Credit. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M4050, M6100, A/16900. 
Guided study with clinical application of advanced physical 
assessment techniques in adults. 

Nursing M8795 

Family Primary Care: Practicum IIB 

2 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6840, M6100, M8557, 
A/18770, A/16727; A/18558. The clinical practicum is designed to 
prepare the students to provide primary health care in a variety 
of settings. Initially, the student will obtain complete histories, 
perform physical examinations, and developmental assessments. 
Subsequently, the student will focus on the recognition and 
management of common problems. The clinical experience will 
familiarize the student with age appropriate physical, cognitive 
and emotional development as well as routine episodic care. The 
goal of the practicum is to prepare the students for the delivery of 
family focused primary care. 



70 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


Nursing M88I0 

Critical Care and Emergency Care Concepts 

2 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: Master’s program core 
courses; M8785, M8815. This course addresses the role, the scope 
of practice and standards of clinical practice of the nurse 
practitioner. It addresses the delivery of care to the critically ill 
patient. Health policy, legal issues and research as it relates to 
the nurse practitioner will be discussed. Other topics covered 
include patient education, case management and quality of 
care issues. This course is no longer offered. 

Nursing M88I5 

Introductory Practicum in Critical Care I for 
the Nurse Practitioner 

1 Credit. Prerequisites and Corequisites: Master’s program core 
courses; M8786. This course focuses on the essential technology 
and procedures utilized in the management of the critically ill that 
is inherent to the role of the nurse practitioner. During 
laboratory / clinical experiences psychomotor skills and the use 
of advanced assessment technologies for the nurse practitioner 
will be developed. This course companions M8786. 

Nursing M88I6 

Practicum in Critical/Acute Care for the 
Nurse Practitioner 

3-4 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M8785, M8810, 

M8815, M6838. 

The practicum in critical/acute care for the nurse practitioner is 
designed to provide the student with practice experiences to 
develop skills of assessment, diagnosis and management of the 
emergency and critically ill adult. The student has the 
opportunity to integrate and synthesize theory, clinical research, 
advanced therapeutics and decision making in this closely 
supervised precepted experience. The role of the nurse 
practitioner is applied in the clinical setting. 

Nursing M8820 

Advanced Practicum in Critical Care for the 
Nurse Practitioner 

3 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6838, M6839, M8816, 
M6100, M6121, M8102. The practicum in critical care for the nurse 
practitioner is designed to provide the student with practice 
experiences to develop skills of assessment, diagnosis and 
management of the emergency patient. The student has the 
opportunity to integrate and synthesize theory, clinical research, 
advanced therapeutics and decision making in this closely 
supervised precepted experience. 


Nursing M8825 

Integration Practicum in Critical Care for the 
Nurse Practitioner 

4-5 Credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: A/16838, A/18816, 

M8820, M6839. The practicum in critical acute care for the nurse 
practitioner is designed to provide the student with practice 
experiences to develop skills of assessment, diagnosis and 
management of the emergency and critically ill patient. The 
student has the opportunity to integrate and synthesize theory, 
clinical research, advanced therapeutics and decision making in 
this closely supervised precepted experience. 

Nursing M8835 

Critical Decision Making in Nurse Anesthesia 
Practice I 

1 credit. Prerequisites and Corequisites: Successful completion of 
all Semester II courses and M8870. Critical analysis of selected 
topics in nurse anesthesia practice. Seminar formats will facilitate 
and engender discussion and critical analysis. 

Nursing M8836 

Critical Decision Making in Nurse 
Anesthesia II 

1 credit. Prerequisites and Corequisites: All Semester III courses 
and M8871. Critical analysis of selected topics in nurse anesthesia 
practice. Seminar formats will facilitate discussion and critical 
analysis. 

Nursing M8837 

Critical Decision Making in Nurse Anesthesia 
Practice III 

1 credit. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Successful completion of all 
previous course work in Anesthesia. Critical analysis of selected 
topics in nurse anesthesia practice related to Residency III 
objectives. Seminar formats will facilitate and engender 
discussion and critical analysis. 

Nursing M8838 

Critical Decision Making in Nurse Anesthesia 
Practice IV 

1 credit. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Successful completion of all 
previous anesthesia course work. Critical analysis of selected topics 
in nurse anesthesia practices related to Residency IV objectives. 
Seminar formats will facilitate and engender discussion for critical 
analysis. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 71 


Nursing M8845 
Cancer in Childhood 

3 credits. This course presents an in-depth examination of 
childhood cancers. Content includes etiology, epidemiology, 
diagnostic and treatment modalities, side effects of therapy, 
emergencies, clinical management, long-term survival and 
terminal illness. The course provides a framework of advanced 
practice for the pediatric oncology clinical nurse specialist and 
pediatric nurse practitioner 

in oncology. 

Nursing M8850 

Family Primary Care: Practicum III 

4 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M8770, N\862S; N\8670, 
M8771. Students assess the health status of individuals of all ages 
in selected settings and recognize and manage common health 
problems in the pediatric and adult population. 

Nursing M8864 

Practicum in Geriatric Primary Care I 

4 credits. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6720, M6100, M8785, 
M6750; M6121. The practicum is a clinical field experience 
designed to provide opportunity for students to acquire initial 
skills in assessment, decision-making and case management of 
care of the geriatric client with a variety of episodic and long¬ 
term health problems. The roles of the adult/geriatric nurse 
practitioner are applied in clinical settings that include 
ambulatory care facilities, community health centers, diagnostic 
and screening centers. 

Nursing M8865 

Practicum in Geriatric Primary Care II 

1 credit. Prerequisite: M6720, M6100, M4010, M6750, M8860, 
M8864. The practicum is a clinical field experience designed to 
provide opportunity for students to strengthen skills in 
assessment, decision-making and case management of geriatric 
clients with a variety of episodic and long-term health problems. 
Students in the clinical settings function more independently 
under preceptor supervision. 

Nursing M8867 

Interdisciplinary Approach to Geriatric 
Assessment and Long Term Care 

3 Credits. This course provides a systematic overview of a 
comprehensive interdisciplinary geriatric assessment. In addition, 
the course reviews the wide range of health and supportive 
services provided for older individuals at one point or another in 
the continuum of long term care. 


Nursing M8870 

Nurse Anesthesia Residency I 

1 credit. Prerequisite: All previous course work in Anesthesia. 
Clinical experiences provide the opportunity for students to 
integrate theory within the clinical setting. Students move along 
continuum from healthy adults to patients with multi-system 
failures. The focus is on perioperative theory transfer, 
development of assessment skills, and the developmental 
implementation and evaluation of an individualized plan of care. 
Patient interviews and teaching are integral to the process. Basic 
principles of decision- making are emphasized throughout. 
Mastery to the specific level of competency is required within a 
specific time framework. Practice settings include operating 
rooms, emergency rooms, and diagnostic suites. CRNA/MD 
preceptors act as facilitators of learning. Clinical conferences and 
professional meetings help to reinforce and enhance learning. 

Nursing M887I 

Nurse Anesthesia Residency II 

1 credit. Prerequisites and Corequisites: M6862, M6870 and 
N18870; A/18836. Clinical experiences provide the opportunity for 
students to integrate theoretical basis of practice within the 
clinical setting. Students move along a continuum from healthy 
adults and children to patients with multi-system failures. The 
focus is on perioperative theory transfer, development of 
assessment skills, and the implementation and evaluation of a 
plan of care. Patient interviews and teaching are integral to the 
process. Basic principles of decision making are emphasized 
throughout. Mastery to the specific level of competency is 
required within a specific time framework. Practice settings 
include operating rooms, emergency rooms, and diagnostic 
suites. CRNA faculty members act as facilitators of learning. 
Clinical conferences and professional meetings help to reinforce 
and evaluate learning. This is the second of four required 
residencies. 

Nursing M8872 
Anesthesia Residency III 

1 credit. Prerequisite or Corequisite: All previous course work in 
Anesthesia. Clinical focus is on the delivery of anesthesia care in a 
broad range of clinical settings to patients with multi-system 
problems. Emphasis is placed on refinement and perfection of 
decision-making skills in patient care management and rapid 
assessment of health status of patients. Collaborative practice 
within a team structure is emphasized. In addition to direct patient 
care, participation in journal club, clinical case reports, and in- 
service presentations to a multidisciplinary audience provide the 
environment for the student to enact his or her role as a clinical 
nurse specialist. Experience in surgery and anesthesia includes 
obstetrics, neurosurgery, and pediatrics. CRNA and MD faculty 
members and preceptors act as guides. 



72 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


Nursing M8873 
Anesthesia Residency IV 

1 credit. Prerequisite: M8870, M8871, all previous class work. 

Clinical focus is on the deliver/ of anesthesia care in a broad range 
of clinical settings to patients with multi-s/stem problems. 

Emphasis is placed on refinement and perfection of decision¬ 
making skills in patient care management and rapid assessment of 
health status patients. Collaborative practice within a team 
structure is emphasized. In addition to direct patient care, 
participation in journal club, clinical case reports, and in-service 
presentations to a multidisciplinary audience provide the 
environment for the student to enact his or her role as a clinical 
nurse specialist. Experience includes obstetrics, neurosurgery, 
cardio-thoracic surgery, pediatrics, post anesthesia care and critical 
care units. CRNA faculty members and preceptors act as guides. 

Nursing M8882 

Oncology Nursing Theory III: Cancer 
Prevention and Detection 

2 credits. Prerequisites: Oncology Nursing Theory/Practice I (or 
Advanced Standing), and Oncology Nursing Theory/Practice II; 
concurrent with Oncology Nursing Practice III. This course presents 
an in-depth examination of primary and secondary cancer 
prevention and the expanded role of the nurse in preventive 
health care. Topics include: health education/behaviors 
carcinogenesis, epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, screening and 
detection and chemoprevention. 

Nursing M8883 

Oncology Nursing Practice III: Cancer 
Prevention and Detection 

3 credits. Prerequisites: Oncology Nursing Theory/Practice I (or 
Advanced Standing), and Oncology Nursing Theory/Practice II; 
concurrent with Oncology Nursing Practice III. This course involves 
the practice of primary and/or secondary cancer prevention 
with designated client populations in community or occupational 
health settings, or in other facilities carrying out cancer 
prevention activities. In the clinical setting, the student will have 
the opportunity to assess, plan, implement and/or evaluate 
primary or secondary prevention activities. 

Nursing M900I 

Social and Intellectual Foundations of Nursing 

4 credits. Prerequisites: Masters of Science in Nursing or by 
permission of the instructor. Examination of the structure and 
growth of contemporary nursing knowledge as it developed 
within a social context. Ideas, events, people, and writings are 
examined for their influence, inter-relationships and significance 
to nursing. Philosophy of science is applied to the development 
of nursing science. 


Nursing M9200 

Doctoral Dissertation Advisement 

0 Credits. This is one option for the student who has completed 
all requirements for the doctorate but the dissertation and must 
maintain continuous enrollment. The student is eligible to 
register for this status if he or she is conducting dissertation 
research and has completed the required number of dissertation 
credits and needs to maintain continuous enrollment until 
graduation. It is an alternative to enrolling in M9820. A fee is 
charged, and the student has access to University resources. 

Nursing M9205 
Analysis and Evaluation of 
Health Policy 

3 credits. Prerequisites: Introductory course in health policy or 
consent of instructor. This course introduces students to the 
contributions of research to the development of health policy. It 
offers a critical review of methods and results of policy research, 
examines the relationship among science, policy and politics, 
explores ways to use policy to extend innovations, and identifies 
critical questions shaping the future policy research agenda. 

Nursing M92I0 

Health Systems Colloquium 

3 credits. Prerequisite: A/19205. This course endeavors to link 
clinical practice in nursing with policy issues, by exploring a series 
of topical clinical issues that have significant health systems and 
health policy implications. Each seminar topic will address policy 
questions at four levels: the delivery system (across settings); 
cultural and ethnic groups; state and regional levels; and national 
level policies. 

Nursing M9280 
Dissertation Credits 

1-3 Credits. Student conducts independent research under the 
guidance of a sponsor and dissertation committee. Minimum of 
2 credits is required, and constitutes a full-time load for doctoral 
candidates. The course can be repeated. A student who has 
completed all required course work and has been admitted to 
candidacy for the doctoral degree must maintain continuous 
enrollment until graduation by enrolling in either M9280 or 
M9200. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 73 


Nursing M9300 

Comparative Research Design 
and Methodology I 

3 credits. Prerequisites: Master’s level course in research and 
statistics. This is the first in a two-course sequence that examines 
the research designs common to nursing and health policy 
research. This course will address aspects of nursing research 
from the perspective of preparing researchers to design and 
carry out studies: the research process; formulation of 
researchable questions and hypotheses; types of research 
variables; sampling designs and power analysis; and the uses, 
strengths and weaknesses of experimental and quasi- 
experimental designs and designs used in health policy research. 

Nursing M930I 

Comparative Research Design and 
Methodology II 

3 Credits. Prerequisite: M9300. This is the second course in a 
two-course sequence that examines the research designs 
common to nursing and health policy research. This course will 
address aspects of nursing research from the perspective of 
preparing researchers to design and carry out studies. The 
course will address: the uses, strengths and weaknesses of 
qualitative, survey, epidemiological and outcomes research. 

Nursing M9350 

Concept Development From Clinical 
Phenomena in Nursing 

3 credits. The course examines the empirical foundation of 
advanced nursing practice, analyzing nursing theories, their 
concepts, and their applicability to observed clinical nursing. 

Focus will be placed on development of critical thinking skills in 
analyzing extant practice for theory implications. Students will 
examine various frameworks for the development, definition, 
analysis, and synthesis of theories and concepts, as well as 
assessing theory applications through direct clinical observation. 
Focus will be placed on development and analysis of selected 
concepts. 

Nursing M9354 
Measurement of Clinical and 
Other Phenomena 

3 credits. Prerequisite: M9500 or permission of instructor. The 
course will explore the methods used to study clinical and other 
phenomena. Included will be discussion of issues related to 
instrumentation, both qualitative and quantitative, access to 
patient populations including clinical trials, validity, reliability and 
ethical aspects of research. 


Nursing M9500 

Health Care of Vulnerable Populations 

3 credits. Seminar aimed at the continued refinement of critical 
thinking associated with a focused area of clinical nursing. The 
framework of the seminar will be the health care of vulnerable 
populations. 

Nursing M9502 and M9503 

4 Credits. The student will decide, with the research advisor or 
selected others, on an individually determined study of statistics 
and research methods based upon the selected focus of 
dissertation study. Selected courses throughout the University 
may be used to satisfy this requirement. 

Nursing M9505 
Research Practicum 

1 Credit. The student works with a faculty member who is 
conducting a research project. The specific nature of the 
experience depends on the nature and stage of the research, but 
might include search and review of relevant literature, data 
collection, data analysis and / or grant preparation. 

Nursing M95I0 

Guided Study in Nursing Science 

1-3 Credits. The student works under the guidance of a faculty 
member to study in depth a topic related to the development of 
nursing science. Specific objectives and requirements are 
negotiated individually. The course may be repeated more than 
once provided different faculty members supervise the learning 
experience. 

Nursing M9520 

Clinical Leadership Colloquium 

2 Credits. This colloquium is designed for the doctoral student in 
the clinical nursing research specialty. Seminars will include an 
examination of current theory, research findings and issues 
regarding an area of clinical practice identified by the student. 
Each student will pursue in-depth study of a clinical phenomenon 
in the context of clinical research. Conceptual and empirical 
issues and the applicable theoretical underpinnings will be 
explored fully. The primary outcome of the colloguium is to 
prepare effective leaders in clinical practice, using principles of 
change, leadership, and the scientific literature as the 
foundations. 



74 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


Nursing M952I 

Practicum in Clinical Leadership 

3 Credits. This course is designed for the doctoral student in the 
clinical leadership and research track. The purpose of the course 
is to provide an opportunity for participation in the development, 
analysis, and evaluation of innovations and/or research in clinical 
practice settings that are relevant to the student’s sub-specialty 
emphasis. This Practicum is required of all doctoral students in 
the clinical leadership and research track, and is open as an 
elective to doctoral students in the health policy track. The 
course experience should be planned with the student’s advisor 
and the practicum coordinator. There must be an identified 
preceptor at each selected site, available for regular consultation 
and guidance as needed. 

Nursing M9608 
Practicum in Health Policy 

This course provides students with specialization in Health Policy, a 
Practicum experience developing and analyzing health policy in an 
organization relevant to the student’s clinical practice specialty. 
Required for Health Policy majors. 

Nursing M9900 
Dissertation Seminar 

2 Credits. The seminar will focus on the dissertation process 
including site access, IRB regulations, research integrity, issues of 
sampling, instrumentation, data collection, analysis, and writing of 
dissertation. 

G40I0 

Research Ethics: Frontiers in Scientific 
Conduct 

1 Credit. Required multidisciplinary course about current issues 
related to proper conduct of basic and scientific research. The 
course follows the NIH Guidelines for instruction. 

G665I 

Philosophy of Science 

3 Credits. This required course, offered by the Philosophy 
department in the graduate School of Arts and Sciences, will give 
students a foundation in the logic of inquiry in the natural sciences. 


Individualized Study in Nursing: M4099, 
M6099, M6350, M8490, M8499, M8550, M8650, 
M8780, M8790, M8843, M8886, M8890. 

1-8 Credits. Individualized, guided learning experiences at the 
graduate level in a selected area of concentration. The area of 
concentration selected should reflect both the role of the clinical 
specialist / nurse practitioner and the student’s specific interests. 
Proposed work must be outlined prior to registration and agreed 
upon by both faculty and student. A project report is 
required. 



75 


Administration and Instructional Affairs 


UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATION 

George Rupp 

PhD 

President of the University 

Jonathan R. Cole 

PhD 

Provost of the University 

Thomas Q. Morris 

MD 

Interim Dean of Clinical and 
Educational Affairs 

David Hirsch 

PhD, MD 

Interim Dean for Research 

Mary O. Mundinger 

DrPH 

Dean, School of Nursing 

Sarah Sheets Cook 

MEd 

Vice Dean, School of Nursing 

Geoffrey S. Berg 

MBA 

Vice Dean, Finance and Administration, 
School of Nursing 

Jennifer Smith 

MBA, MPH 

Assistant Dean, Development and Alumni 
Affairs, School of Nursing 

Elizabeth R. Lenz 

PhD 

Associate Dean, Research and Doctoral 
Studies, School of Nursing 

Judy Honig 

EdD 

Assistant Dean, Student Services, School of 
Nursing 

Karen Piacentini 

Associate Dean, Practice 
Development 

BA, Scripps College; MBA, USC 


OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Joyce Anastasi 

Associate Professor of Nursing Director, 
Center for AIDS Research 
BSN, Wagner College 
MA, New York University 
PhD, Adelphi University 
FA AN 

Research: AIDS, HIV symptomology 

Carolyn Auerhahn 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
Diploma, Bellevue School of Nursing 
BS, Pace University 
MS, Columbia University 
EdD, Teachers College, Columbia 
University 

Certified Adult and Geriactric Nurse 
Practitioner 

Suzanne Bakken 

Professor of Nursing 
BSN, Arizona State University 
MS, University of California 
at San Francisco 
DNSc, University of California 
at San Francisco 
FA AN 

Nurse Informaticist 
Research: Coding and Classification 
Systems for Ambulatory Care 

Geoffrey S. Berg 

Assistant Clinical Professor of Nursing 
Management 

Associate Dean, Finance and Administration 

BA, Syracuse 

MBA, Boston University 


Penelope Buschman 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 

Director, Psychiatric Mental Health Program 

AB, Wheaton College 

BS, Columbia University 

MS, Boston University 

FA AN 

Certified Clinical Specialist in Psychiatric and 
Mental Health Nursing 
Research: Grief and Bereavement 
Faculty Practice: Babies and Children’s 
Hospital, CPMC 

Mary Byrne 

Associate Professor of Nursing 

BS, Cornell University 

MS, Adelphi University 

MPH, Columbia University 

PhD, Adelphi University 

Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner 

Research: High Risk Families 

Sarah Sheets Cook 

Professor of Clinical Nursing 
Vice Dean; Administrative Director, WHO 
Collaborating Center for International 
Nursing Development of Advanced Practice 
BSN, Michigan 
MEd, Columbia University 
DPNAP, Certified Perinatal Nurse 
Specialist, Internationally 
Board Certified Lactation Consultant 
Faculty Practice: Maternal-Child Health 
Joint Practice, OB/GYN, Stamford, CT. 



76 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL AFFAIRS 


Lesly Curtis 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
Director, Entry to Practice Program 
BS, Columbia University 
MS, Columbia University 
MA, Purdue 
NP Certification 
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy 
Practice: Psychiatric Nursing, 
private practice 

Karen Desjardins 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
Director, Geriatric Nurse Practitioner 
Program 

BS, Medical College of Georgia 

MS, Columbia University 

MPH, Columbia University 

AANP - Adult NP 

ANCC - Geriatric NP 

Practice: Adult/Geriatric Primary Care 

Jennifer Dohrn 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing; 

Director, Nurse Midwifery Program 
BA, University of Chicago 
BSN, Hunter College 
MS, Columbia University 
Certified Nurse Midwife 
Faculty Practice: Director, Morris Heights 
Birthing Center 

Noreen Esposito 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing; 
Director, Women’s Health Nurse 
Practitioner Program 

Dip., Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing 
BS, REDP, University of the State of New 
York 

MS, State University of New York at Stony 
Brook 

EdD, Columbia University 
Certified Women’s Health Nurse 
Practitioner 

Research: Access to health care for women 


Richard Garfield 

Henrik H. Bendixen Clinical Professor of 
International Nursing; Co-Director, WHO 
Collaborating Center for International 
Nursing Development of Advanced Practice 
ADN, Hahnemann Medical College 
BA, Beacon College 
MPH, Columbia University 
MS, Columbia University 
DrPH, Columbia University 
Certified Community Health Nursing 
Clinical Specialist 

Research: Health policy and community 
access patterns for health care; Effect of 
political and economic embargoes on 
health care 

Kristine Gebbie 

Elizabeth S. Gill Associate Professor of Clinical 
Nursing; Director, Center for Health Policy 
and Health Services Research 
BSN, Saint Olaf College 
MN, UCLA 

DrPH, University of Michigan 
FAAN 

Research: Health Policy and Public Health 
Systems 

Faculty Practice; Public Health Systems 
Development 

Elizabeth Hall 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing; 

Director, Family Nurse Practitioner Program 
BSN, William Patterson College 
MS, Pace University 

Certified Family Nurse Practitioner, and 
Geriatric Nurse Practitioner 
Faculty Practice: The Center for Advanced 
Practice 

Judy Honig 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing; 

BS, State University of New York (Buffalo) 

MS, Seton Hall 

MA, Columbia University 

EdD, Teachers College, Columbia 

University 

Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner 
Faculty Practice: Pediatrics 2000 


Ritamarie John 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
Director, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner 
Program 

BSN, Georgetown University 
MSN, Seton Hall University 
Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner 

Elaine Larson 

Professor of Pharmaceutical and Therapeutic 
Research and Public Health 
BS, MA, PhD, University of Washington, 
Seattle 

Post-doctoral Fellowship, University of 
Pennsylvania 
FAAN, DPNAP 
Certified in Infection Control 
Research: Epidemiology, Infectious Diseases 

Timothy J. Lehey 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
Director, Nurse Anesthesia Program 
BS, Cornell University School of Nursing 
BA, City University of New York 
MS, Columbia University 
Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist 
Faculty Practice: Nyack Anesthesia 
Associates 

Elizabeth R. Lenz 

Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing 
Research; Associate Dean, Research and 
Doctoral Studies 
BSN, DePauw University 
MS, Boston College 
PhD, University of Delaware 
FAAN 

Research: Impact of illness on families; 
recovery from cardiac events; beginning 
families and parenting; evaluation of 
primary care practice 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL AFFAIRS 77 


Maribeth Massie 

Assistant Program Director, Nurse Anesthesia 
Instructor in Clinical Nursing 
BSN, Ohio State University 
MS, Columbia University 
Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist 
Faculty Practice: Maryland Shock Trauma 
Unit 

Lonnie Morris 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
BS, Farleigh Dickenson 
MS, Columbia University 
ND, Case Western Reserve 
ACMM 

Practice: Private Midwifery Practice 

Marlene McHugh 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
BS, Columbia University 
MS, Columbia University 
Certified Family Nurse Practitioner; 
Certified Critical Care Nurse 

Mary O. Mundinger 

Dean; Centennial Professor in Health Policy; 
Director, WHO Collaborating Center for 
International Nursing Development of 
Advanced Practice 
BSN, Michigan 
MA, Columbia University 
DrPH, Columbia University 
FA AN 

Research: Health policy; family care of the 
frail elderly; technology assessment in 
home care 

Anita Nirenberg 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
Program Director, Oncology 
BS, Skidmore 
MS, Columbia University 
Certified Pediatric Primary Care 
Oncology Certified Nurse 
Advanced Oncology Nurse 


Josephine Sapp 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
BSN, William Patterson College 
MS, Columbia University 
Certified Adult Psychiatric Clinical Nurse 
Specialist and Psychiatric/Mental Health 
Nurse Practitioner 

Faculty Practice: Psychiatric Mental Health 
Nursing, 

Bayonne, NJ 

Jennifer Smith 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
BSN, University of Pittsburgh 
MBA, Columbia University 
MPH, Columbia University 
Clinical Nurse 

Janice Smolowitz 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
BS, SUNY 

MS, Columbia University 
EdD, Teacher’s College, Columbia 
University 

ANP, CS, Certified Adult Nurse 
Practitioner 

CDE, Certified Diabetes Educator 
Research: Diabetes, Hypertension 
Practice: Adult Primary Care 


JoAnne Staats 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
Program Director, Adult Primary Care 
BS, Adelphi University 
MS, Columbia University 
Diploma, St. Luke’s School of Nursing 
ANP/CS Certified Adult Nurse 
Practitioner 

Practice: Adult Primary Care/HIV 

Edwidge Jourdain Thomas 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
BSN, Rutgers University 
MS, Columbia University 
Faculty Practice: CAPNA 

Kimberly Whitfill 

Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing 
BS, Kansas State University 
BS, Columbia University 
MS, Columbia University 
Certified Nurse Midwife 
Neonatal Resuscitation - Certified 

Laura Zeidenstein 

Assistant Professor of Clinical 
Nursing 

BA, Evergreen State College 
BSC, SUNY 
MSC, Yale University 
AAP/AHA Neonatal Resuscitation 
Provider 

Certified Nurse/Midwife 
BLS 

Research: Nurse/Midwifery 



78 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL AFFAIRS 


FULL-TIME CLINICAL 

PART-TIME FACULTY 

OFFICE OF SUPPORT 

FACULTY 

Jeanmarie Baker, BA, MA, 

SERVICES STAFF 

Susanne Arcuni, MS, FNP 

MS, APRN, NP, CS 

Dennis Villa 

Karen Betten, MS, ACNP 

Umberto Conte, Pharm D 

Manager of Operations 

Catherine Brown, MA, ANP 

Judy Cheng, Pharm D 

Stewart Brisby 

Senior Secretary 

Katherine Catanese, MS, CNS 

Aileen Clucas, MSN 

Pamela Walker 

Rozelle Corda, MS, FNP 

Ellen Lauria, MS, RN 

Senior Secretary 

Maureen Davey, MS, FNP 

Patricia Puma, MS, CRNA 

Helen Gee 

Mary Donovan, MS, ACNP 

Ronald Slavin, PhD 

Junior Accountant 

Ana Echeverri, MS, FNP 

David Taft, PhD 

Wassie Agalew 

Administrative Assistant 

Margaret Flannery, MS, FNP 

Nancy Smillen, MS, CRNA 

Luis Medrano 

Patricia Harren, MS, FNP 


Senior Clerk 

Anne Herlick, MS, FNP 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN STAFF 


Diane LaPoint-Rudow, MS, ANP, 
CCTC 

Cheryl M. Francis 

Senior Administrative Assistant 


Linda Lofrumento, MS, ANP, 

Kristin Warbasse 


FNP 

Stasi Lubansky, MS, ANP 

Executive Assistant to the Dean 


Hope Mazurek, MS, ACNP 

OFFICE OF STUDENT 


Christine Merle, MS, PNP 

SERVICES STAFF 


Lorraine Olivero-Rivera, MS, 

FNP 

Judy Honig 

Assistant Dean, Student Services 


W. Daniel Roberts, MS, ACNP- 

Oscar Vasquez 


CS 

Financial Aid Officer 


Edwidge Thomas, MS, ANP 

Juanita Johnson 


Mary Ellen Tresgallo, MS, FNP, 

Administrative Assistant 


MPH 

Alexandra Mena 


Joan Valas, MS, ACNP 

Secretary/Receptionist 


Kristine Viscovich, MS, ANP 

Desiree Roach 


% O 

Administrative Aide 




Tentative Academic Calendar: 
1999-2001 


79 


The following Academic Calendar was correct and 
complete as of the time of publication; however, the 
University reserves the right to revise or amend it, in 
whole or in part, at any time. Information on the 
current status of the Academic Calendar for the 
School of Nursing may be obtained in the Office of 
Student Information Services 212-305-5756. 

MAJOR RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS 

Some of the major religious holidays are shown 
below. The Jewish and Islamic holy days begin at 
sundown of the preceding day. The exact dates for the 
Islamic holy days may vary by one or two days from 
the estimated dates given below. 

1999 - 2000 

Rosh Hashanah 

Saturday, Sunday, September 11, 12 
Yom Kippur 

Monday, September 20 

First days of Succoth 

Saturday, Sunday, September 25, 26 

Concluding days of Succoth 
Saturday, Sunday, October 2, 3 

Id al Fitr 

Saturday, January 8 

Lunar New Year 
Tuesday, January 31 

Id al Adha 

Thursday, March 16 

First days of Passover 
Thursday, Friday, April 20, 21 


Good Friday 
Friday, April 21 

Concluding days of Passover 
Thursday, Friday, April 26, 27 

Shavuoth 

Friday, Saturday, June 9, 10 

2000 - 2001 

Rosh Hashanah 

Saturday, Sunday, September 30, October 1 

Yom Kippur 
Monday, October 9 

First days of Succoth 

Saturday, Sunday, October 14, 15 

Concluding days of Succoth 
Saturday, Sunday, October 21, 22 

Id al Fitr 

Wednesday, December 27 

Lunar New Year 
Wednesday, January 24 

Id al Adha 
Tuesday, March 6 

First days of Passover 
Sunday, Monday, April 8, 9 

Good Friday 
Friday, April 13 

Concluding days of Passover 
Saturday, Sunday, April 14, 15 

Shavuoth 

Monday, Tuesday, May 28, 29 



80 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 


AUTUMN TERM 1999 


August 2 

Monday. Last day to file an application for October degrees. 

September 1 - 2 

1 

Wednesday - Thursday. Registration continuing and new students. 

Wednesday. Orientation 

7 

12 

Tuesday. Classes begin. First day to add/drop programs. 

Thursday. Last day to add/drop programs. No adjustment of fees for 
individual courses dropped after this date. 

13 

Monday. ETP Autumn Term begins. 

October 20 

Wednesday. Award of October degrees. 

November 2 

Tuesday. Election Day. No classes. 

25-28 

Thursday - Sunday. Thanksgiving Holiday. No classes. 

December 1 

Wednesday. Last day to file an application for February degrees. 

6-8 

Monday - Wednesday. New Students Registration. 

13 

Monday. Last day of classes. 

17 

Friday. ETP Autumn Term ends. 

14-22 

Tuesday - Wednesday. Examinations period. Term ends. 








ACADEMIC CALENDAR 81 

SPRING TERM 2000 

January 

3 

Monday. ETP Winter Term begins. 


11-13 

Tuesday. Registration for Spring Term. 


17 

Monday. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. University holiday. 


18 

Tuesday. Classes Begin. First day to add/drop programs. 


28 

Tuesday. Last day to add/drop programs. No adjustment of fees for 
individual courses dropped after this date. 

February 

I 

Tuesday. Last day to file an application for May degrees. 


9 

Wednesday. Award of February degrees. 


21 

Monday. President’s Day. No classes. 

March 

3 

Friday. ETP Winter Term ends. 


6-11 

Monday - Friday. ETP Spring Recess. 


13-17 

Monday - Friday. Spring Recess. 

May 

1 

Monday. Last day of classes. 


5-12 

Friday - Friday. Examination period. Term ends. 

COMMENCEMENT 

May 

17 

Wednesday. Conferring of degrees. 









82 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 


SUMMER SESSION 2000 

May 

18- 19 

Thursday - Friday. Registration for Summer Session. 


22 

Monday. Classes begin. First day to add/drop programs. 


26 

Friday. Last day to add/drop programs. No adjustment 
of fees for individual courses dropped after this date. 


29 

Monday. Memorial Day. No classes. 


30 

ETP Summer Semester begins. 

July 

4 

Tuesday. Independence Day. No classes. 


31 

Summer Session ends. 

August 

II 

Friday. ETP Summer Session ends. 






ACADEMIC CALENDAR 83 


AUTUMN TERM 2000 


August 

29-31 

30 

Tuesday - Thursday. Registration for the Fall Term. 

Wednesday. Orientation. 

September 

4 

Monday. Labor Day. No Classes. 


5 

Tuesday. Classes begin. First day of add/drop. 


II 

Monday. ETP classes begin. 


12 

Tuesday. Last day to add/drop. NO ADJUSTMENT OF FEES FOR 
INDIVIDUAL COURSES DROPPED AFTER THIS DATE. 

October 

18 

Wednesday. Award of October degrees. 

November 

6 

Monday. Academic Holiday. No classes. 


7 

Tuesday. Election Day. No classes. 


17 

Thursday. Last day to add/drop programs. 


TBA 

Continuing students register for Spring Term. 


23 - 26 

Thursday - Sunday. Thanksgiving Holidays. 

December 

1 

Friday. Last day to file an application for February Degrees. 


II 

Monday. Last day of classes. 


15 

Friday. Last day of ETP classes. 


15 - 22 

Friday - Friday. Examination period. Term ends. 








84 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 


SPRING TERM 2001 

January 

2 

Monday. ETP Winter Term begins. 


10- II 

15 

Wednesday - Thursday. Registration for Spring Term. (Subject to change.) 
Monday. Martin Luther King Day. No Classes. 


16 

Tuesday. Classes begin. First day to add/drop programs. 


23 

Tuesday. Last day to add/drop programs. NO ADJUSTMENT OF 

FEES FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES DROPPED AFTER THIS 
DATE. 

February 

1 

Thursday. Last day to file an application for May degrees. 


14 

Wednesday. Award of February degrees. 


19 

Monday. President’s Day. No classes. 

March 

2 

Friday. ETP Winter Term ends. 


5-9 

Monday - Friday. ETP Spring Recess. 


12 

Monday . ETP Spring Term begins. 


12-16 

Monday - Friday. Spring Recess. 

April 

30 

Monday. Last day of classes. 

May 

4- II 

Friday - Friday. Examination period. Term ends. 


II 

Friday. ETP Spring Term ends. 

COMMENCEMENT 


May 


16 


Wednesday. Conferring of degrees. 










ACADEMIC CALENDAR 85 


SUMMER SESSION 2001 


May 

17-18 

21 

25 

28 

29 

Thursday - Friday. Registration for summer term. (Subject to change.) 
Monday. Classes begin. 

Friday. Last day to add/drop programs. NO ADJUSTMENT OF FEES 
FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES DROPPED AFTER THIS DATE. 

Monday. Memorial Day. No classes. 

Tuesday. ETP Summer Session begins. 

July 

4 

Wednesday. Independence Day. No classes. 


27 

Friday. Last day of class. 

August 

1 

Wednesday. Last day to file for October degrees. 


10 

Friday. End of ETP Summer Session. 


29 

Wednesday. Orientation. 


29-30 

Wednesday - Thursday. New students registration for Autumn Term. 

(Subject to change.) 


AUTUMN TERM 2001 


September 

3 

4 

10 

14 

Monday. Labor Day. 

Tuesday. Classes begin and first day to add/drop programs. 

Monday. Classes begin, ETP Autumn Term. 

Friday. Last day to add/drop programs. NO ADJUSTMENT OF FEES 
FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES DROPPED AFTER THIS DATE. 

October 

17 

Wednesday. Award of October degrees. 

November 

5 

Monday. Academic Holiday. No classes. 


6 

Tuesday. Election Day. No classes. 


22-23 

Thursday - Friday. Thanksgiving Day. No classes. 

December 

3 

Monday. Last day to file for February degrees. 


10 

Monday. Last day of classes. 


II -14 

Tuesday - Friday. Study days. 


14 

Friday. Last day of classes, ETP Autumn Term. 


17-21 

Monday - Friday. Final Examination period. Term ends. 











86 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 


SPRING TERM 2002 

January 

7 

Monday. Classes begin; ETP Winter Term. 


16- 17 

Wednesday - Thursday. New student registration for Spring Term. (Subject 
to change.) 


21 

Monday. Martin Luther King Day. No classes. 


22 

Tuesday. Classes begin. First day to add/drop programs. 

February 

1 

Friday. Last day to add/drop programs. NO ADJUSTMENT OF FEES 
FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES DROPPED AFTER THIS DATE. 


13 

Wednesday. Award of February degrees. 

March 

1 

Friday. Classes end, ETP Winter Term. 


4-8 

Monday - Friday. ETP Spring Recess. 


II 

Monday. Classes begin ETP Spring Term. 


18-22 

Monday - Friday. Spring Recess. 

May 

6 

Monday. Last day of classes. 


7-9 

Tuesday - Thursday. Study days. 


10 

Friday. Last day of classes ETP Spring Term. 


10-17 

Friday - Friday. Examination period. 


22 

Wednesday. Commencement. 

SUMMER SESSION 2002 

May 

23 -24 

Thursday - Friday. New student registration for Summer Session. (Subject to 
change.) 


20 

Monday. Class begin. First day to add/drop programs.. 


24 

Friday. Last day to add/drop programs. NO ADJUSTMENT OF 

FEES FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES DROPPED AFTER THIS 
DATE. 


27 

Monday. Memorial Day. No classes. 


28 

Classes begin ETP Summer Session. 

July 

4 

Thursday. Independence Day. No classes. 


31 

Wednesday. Term ends. 

August 

1 

Thursday. Last day to file an application for October degree. 


9 

Friday. ETP Summer Session ends. 


28 

Wednesday. Orientation. 











ACADEMIC CALENDAR 87 

AUTUMN TERM 2002 

September 

2 

Monday. Labor Day. No classes. 


3 

Tuesday. Classes begin. First day to add/drop programs. 


8 

Monday. Classes begin ETP Autumn Term. 


13 

Friday. Last day to add/drop programs. NO ADJUSTMENT OF FEES 
FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES DROPPED AFTER THIS DATE. 

October 

16 

Wednesday. Award of October degrees. 

November 

4 

Monday. Academic Holiday. No classes. 


5 

Tuesday. Election Day. No classes. 


28-29 

Thursday - Friday. Thanksgiving Holiday. No classes. 

December 

9 

Monday. Last day of classes. 


10- 12 

Tuesday - Friday. Study days. 


13 

Friday. Classes end ETP Autumn Term. 


13-20 

Friday - Friday. Examination period. Term ends. 








88 


Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center 
Columbia University 

HEALTH SCIENCES CAMPUS 



1. Bara Haven Apartments 

2. Bard Hall Medical Student 
Residence 

3. The Lawrence C. Kolb 
Research Building 

4. Armand Hammer Health 
Sciences Center- 
Augustus C. Long Library 

5. The New York State 
Psychiatric Institute 

6. The Neurological Institute 
of New York 

7. The Milstein Hospital 
Building 

8. The Dana W. Atchley 
Pavilion 


9. School of Nursing 

10. William Black Medical 
Research Building 

11. Alumni Auditorium 

12. College of Physicians 
and Surgeons 

13. Vanderbilt Clinic 

14. School of Public Health 

15. The Harkness Pavilion 

16. The Presbyterian Hospital 
Building 

17. The Pauline A. Hartford 
Memorial Chapel 

18. Radiotherapy Center 


19. Babies Hospital 
Building, North 

20. Babies Hospital 
Building, South 

Babies Hospital 
Sloane Hospital for 
Women 

21. Eye Institute Research 
Laboratories 

22. The Edward S. Harkness 
Eye Institute 

23. Service Building 


11/88 























































































Riverside Drive 


89 


Columbia University 
The Morningside Campus & Environs 


International 

House 






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Manlianan 
School ol Music 








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Butler Hall 



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Attain , 

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East Campus 


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* Italissa 

. 


my ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■■ .. 

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* House 

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* House 


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West 116th Slreel 



620 610 Casa o 00 

Hlspaeica 


635 

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Schaplro 

West 115th Street 


*12 Parbng Ull 

St. Hilda's and Wals ®° 

St Hugh's School Broadwav 

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Church 



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1127 

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Wesl 115th Street 

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West 114th Street 


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West 113th Street 

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552 514 


SI. Luke's Hospital 


535 


► Armstrong 

A 


West 112th Street 


5/94 


Momingside Drive 



























































































































































HUDSON RIVER 


90 


The Morningside Heights Area of New York City 




West 112th Street 

CD 

\ Bank Street 
\CoHege 


Burgess 

CD 

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West 111th Street 

< 

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/ Cathedral Parkway (West 110th Street) 


Cathedral Church of 
St. John the Divine 



Harmony 


Carlton 


West 109th Street 


P I vJIICC 
□ 


West 108th Street 







































































































































































































































































































* 


\ r Cj The Columbia University 


r r r r 


School of Nursing 

TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE SCHOOL: 


Columbia University School of Nurs ing 
630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032 
(212) 305-5756, fax (212) 305-3680 


























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